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[ 57] THE UNIVERSAL JEWISH

by Isaak Landman,
[ 57] THE UNIVERSAL JEWISH ENCYCLOPEDIA MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS be made also of distinguished sonata recitals by Leo-pold Auer ( with Mme. Essipov, who was not Jewish). Other distinguished chamber music ensembles of Jewish interest included the Moscow Quintet, formed by Simeon Bellison in 1902, and the Cherniavsky Trio, composed of three brothers, organized in 1903. HUNGARY. The major string quartet in Hungary was the one organized by Jenö Hubay. His ensemble included two eminent Jewish musicians, Victor von Herzfeld, violinist, and David Popper, cellist. Another great Hungarian ensemble was the Budapest String Quartet, organized in 1921 by the Hungarian- Jewish musician, Emil Hauser, who subsequently did much for music in Palestine. Under Hausers direction ( for ten years) the Quartet became one of the great en-sembles of the world. In the UNITED STATES Jewish participation in chamber music performances has been particularly rich. One of the earliest chamber music ensembles to tour America and to create a consciousness for good music was the Mendelssohn Quintet, of which Sam Franko was a moving spirit. Leopold Lichtenberg formed the cele-brated Margulies Trio in 1890, for twenty years a major organization of its kind; Adele Margulies, the pianist of this group, also was Jewish. In 1893 Sam Franko founded a series of chamber music concerts at the Aschenbrödel Club in New York city, which was the leading musical activity in the city over a period of a decade. The first two great string quartets of American origin were the Kneisel and Flonzaley quartets. Jewish influence was felt in both these en-sembles: Samuel Gardner was a violinist in the Kneisel Quartet for a period; Clarence Adler officiated in all performances requiring the services of a pianist by the Flonzaleys. Other early chamber music ensembles in America with Jews included the following: the David Mannes Quartet,, formed by David Mannes in 1902; the Alex-ander Saslavsky Quartet, organized by Saslavsky in 1907; the Malkin Trio, composed of three brothers, originating in 1914; the Eluscho Trio ( 1916), of which Richard Epstein was pianist, and Samuel Gardner violinist; the Letz Quartet ( also 1916), which included Sándor Harmati and Edward Kreiner; the New York Trio ( 1919), created by Clarence Adler; the Cleveland String Quartet, formed in 1919 by Nikolai Sokoloff, with Hermann Kolodkin and Louis Edlin as its other Jewish members ( in 1926 Sokoloff was succeeded by another Jewish violinist, Joseph Fuchs). After the first World War, chamber music assumed a position of major importance in the concert activity of the United States. It can be said that this position was acquired largely as a result of Jewish contributions. Principal ensembles in 1942 included the following: the Compinsky Trio, composed of three brothers ( 1920); the Gordon String Quartet, organized by Jacques Gordon in 1921, and including such Jewish artists as David Sackson and Naóum Benditzky ( in 1938 Jacques Gordon won the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge medal for distinguished services to chamber music); the Mischa Elman Quartet ( 1924); the Lenox String Quartet, with Sándor Harmati as first violinist ( 1922); the Stringwood Ensemble, organized by Simeon Bellison in 1925; the Musical Art Quartet, created by Sascha Jacobsen in 1926; the Stradivarius Quartet The Roth quartet ( 1929), of which Felix M. Warburg was the sponsor; the Perolé Quartet ( 1930), with its exclusively Jewish membership of Joseph Coleman, David Mankovitz, Lillian Fuchs, and Ernst Silberstein; the Coolidge String Quartet ( 1936), the first violinist of which was William Kroll; the Philharmonic Symphony String Quartet ( 1939), with Mishel Piastro and Joseph Schuster; the reorganized Roth Quartet ( 1939), which now included R. Weinstock, Julius Shaier and Oliver Edel. It is essential to call attention to a number of or-ganizations created by Jews for the purpose of spreading the gospel of chamber music. In 1916 Louis Persinger formed the Chamber Music Society of San Francisco, which existed for twelve years, bringing chamber music to the West Coast. In 1918 Harold Bauer formed the famous Beethoven Society of New York, which for twenty years gave annual series of distinctive cham-ber music concerts by the worlds foremost artists. Eddy Brown was founder and director of the Chamber Music Society of America ( 1932), which over a period of several years organized more than 500 chamber music concerts throughout the country. In 1939 I. A. Hirschmann created the New Friends of Music in New York, a non- profit- making organization presenting distinguished concerts of chamber music on late Sun-day afternoons; one of the artistic directors of this venture in 1942 was Hortense Monath, the pianist, in private life Mrs. I. A. Hirschmann. 2. Choruses. GERMANY. One of the pioneer figures in the early history of choral performances in Germany was Felix Mendelssohn. In 1829 he was responsible for the first performance of Bachs Passion According to St. Matthew, which restored the great work of art to the world after its long lapse into obscurity. In 1833 Mendelssohn became conductor of the Berlin Sing-akademie ( the first important secular chorus in Europe). It was because of his admirable work with this or-ganization that Frederick William II invited Mendels-söhn to Berlin to organize the Cathedral Choir ( 1841), soon to achieve a place of unique importance among the choral organizations of Europe. Jews were responsible for the formation and develop-ment of other celebrated German choral organizations. In 1836 Ferdinand Hiller conducted the Cäcilien Verein in Frankfort, helping to establish it on a permanent basis. In 1843 Julius Stern was called to Berlin to direct the Deutscher Gesangverein, which he did for three years. In 1847 Stern founded his own choral Chapter Home | Index AAR- AZU | BAA- CAN | CAN- EDU | EDU- GNO | GOD- IZS | JAB- LEX | LEX- MOS  | MOS- PRO | PRO- SPE | SPI- ZYL

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[ 57] THE UNIVERSAL JEWISH ENCYCLOPEDIA MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS be made also of distinguished sonata recitals by Leo-pold Auer ( with Mme. Essipov, who was not Jewish). Other distinguished chamber music ensembles of Jewish interest included the Moscow Quintet, formed by Simeon Bellison in 1902, and the Cherniavsky Trio, composed of three brothers, organized in 1903. HUNGARY. The major string quartet in Hungary was the one organized by Jenö Hubay. His ensemble included two eminent Jewish musicians, Victor von Herzfeld, violinist, and David Popper, cellist. Another great Hungarian ensemble was the Budapest String Quartet, organized in 1921 by the Hungarian- Jewish musician, Emil Hauser, who subsequently did much for music in Palestine. Under Hauser's direction ( for ten years) the Quartet became one of the great en-sembles of the world. In the UNITED STATES Jewish participation in chamber music performances has been particularly rich. One of the earliest chamber music ensembles to tour America and to create a consciousness for good music was the Mendelssohn Quintet, of which Sam Franko was a moving spirit. Leopold Lichtenberg formed the cele-brated Margulies Trio in 1890, for twenty years a major organization of its kind; Adele Margulies, the pianist of this group, also was Jewish. In 1893 Sam Franko founded a series of chamber music concerts at the Aschenbrödel Club in New York city, which was the leading musical activity in the city over a period of a decade. The first two great string quartets of American origin were the Kneisel and Flonzaley quartets. Jewish influence was felt in both these en-sembles: Samuel Gardner was a violinist in the Kneisel Quartet for a period; Clarence Adler officiated in all performances requiring the services of a pianist by the Flonzaleys. Other early chamber music ensembles in America with Jews included the following: the David Mannes Quartet,, formed by David Mannes in 1902; the Alex-ander Saslavsky Quartet, organized by Saslavsky in 1907; the Malkin Trio, composed of three brothers, originating in 1914; the Eluscho Trio ( 1916), of which Richard Epstein was pianist, and Samuel Gardner violinist; the Letz Quartet ( also 1916), which included Sándor Harmati and Edward Kreiner; the New York Trio ( 1919), created by Clarence Adler; the Cleveland String Quartet, formed in 1919 by Nikolai Sokoloff, with Hermann Kolodkin and Louis Edlin as its other Jewish members ( in 1926 Sokoloff was succeeded by another Jewish violinist, Joseph Fuchs). After the first World War, chamber music assumed a position of major importance in the concert activity of the United States. It can be said that this position was acquired largely as a result of Jewish contributions. Principal ensembles in 1942 included the following: the Compinsky Trio, composed of three brothers ( 1920); the Gordon String Quartet, organized by Jacques Gordon in 1921, and including such Jewish artists as David Sackson and Naóum Benditzky ( in 1938 Jacques Gordon won the Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge medal for distinguished services to chamber music); the Mischa Elman Quartet ( 1924); the Lenox String Quartet, with Sándor Harmati as first violinist ( 1922); the Stringwood Ensemble, organized by Simeon Bellison in 1925; the Musical Art Quartet, created by Sascha Jacobsen in 1926; the Stradivarius Quartet The Roth quartet ( 1929), of which Felix M. Warburg was the sponsor; the Perolé Quartet ( 1930), with its exclusively Jewish membership of Joseph Coleman, David Mankovitz, Lillian Fuchs, and Ernst Silberstein; the Coolidge String Quartet ( 1936), the first violinist of which was William Kroll; the Philharmonic Symphony String Quartet ( 1939), with Mishel Piastro and Joseph Schuster; the reorganized Roth Quartet ( 1939), which now included R. Weinstock, Julius Shaier and Oliver Edel. It is essential to call attention to a number of or-ganizations created by Jews for the purpose of spreading the gospel of chamber music. In 1916 Louis Persinger formed the Chamber Music Society of San Francisco, which existed for twelve years, bringing chamber music to the West Coast. In 1918 Harold Bauer formed the famous Beethoven Society of New York, which for twenty years gave annual series of distinctive cham-ber music concerts by the world's foremost artists. Eddy Brown was founder and director of the Chamber Music Society of America ( 1932), which over a period of several years organized more than 500 chamber music concerts throughout the country. In 1939 I. A. Hirschmann created the New Friends of Music in New York, a non- profit- making organization presenting distinguished concerts of chamber music on late Sun-day afternoons; one of the artistic directors of this venture in 1942 was Hortense Monath, the pianist, in private life Mrs. I. A. Hirschmann. 2. Choruses. GERMANY. One of the pioneer figures in the early history of choral performances in Germany was Felix Mendelssohn. In 1829 he was responsible for the first performance of Bach's Passion According to St. Matthew, which restored the great work of art to the world after its long lapse into obscurity. In 1833 Mendelssohn became conductor of the Berlin Sing-akademie ( the first important secular chorus in Europe). It was because of his admirable work with this or-ganization that Frederick William II invited Mendels-söhn to Berlin to organize the Cathedral Choir ( 1841), soon to achieve a place of unique importance among the choral organizations of Europe. Jews were responsible for the formation and develop-ment of other celebrated German choral organizations. In 1836 Ferdinand Hiller conducted the Cäcilien Verein in Frankfort, helping to establish it on a permanent basis. In 1843 Julius Stern was called to Berlin to direct the Deutscher Gesangverein, which he did for three years. In 1847 Stern founded his own choral << Chapter >> Home | Index AAR- AZU | BAA- CAN | CAN- EDU | EDU- GNO | GOD- IZS | JAB- LEX | LEX- MOS | MOS- PRO | PRO- SPE | SPI- ZYL
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