<i>The Library Source</i>
Welcome to the The Library Source!
Need help withour eBooks?
Contact PublishersRow.com
Click here, to go to our main store

  The Library Source eBookStore  

Civil War humor
preview of book Civil War humor
text of book Civil War humor

Civil War humor

Author:
Publisher: University Press of Mississippi
Publication Date: 2010
Category: General
Grades: Highly recommended
Number of Pages: 181
Appropriate for: Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers
Choice rating: 
MARC: download

Free Preview    Email to Friend   Add to wish list
 Available as: (for format`s description click on its name)
Scholar eBook Scholar eBook ISBN: 9781604737486  
$28.00
 
 Reg.: $
28.00 per N pages
 
Library Edition Library Edition ISBN: 9781604737486  
$43.40
 
 Reg.: $
43.40 per N pages
 
About this title

A thorough account of the extraordinary breadth of comedic output during America's Civil War.

In Civil War Humor, author Cameron C. Nickels examines the various forms of comedic popular artifacts produced in America from 1861 to 1865 and looks at how wartime humor was created, disseminated, and received by both sides of the conflict. Broadsides, newspaper journalism, sheet music covers, lithographs, political cartoons, light verse, printed envelopes, comic valentines, humor magazines, and penny dreadfuls--from and for the Union and the Confederacy--are analyzed at length.

Nickels argues that the war coincided with the rise of inexpensive mass printing in the United States and thus subsequently with the rise of the country's widely distributed popular culture. As such, the war was as much a "paper war"--involving the use of publications to disseminate propaganda and ideas about the Union's and the Confederacy's positions--as one taking place on battlefields. For both sides humor deflated pretensions, coped with the sobering realities of war, and established political stances and strategies of critiquing them. Civil War Humor explores how the combatants portrayed Jefferson Davis and Abraham Lincoln, life on the home front, battles, and African Americans.

Civil War Humor reproduces over sixty illustrations and texts created during the war and provides close readings of these materials. At the same time, it places this corpus of comedy in the context of wartime history, economies, and tactics. This comprehensive overview examines humor's role in shaping and reflecting the cultural imagination of the nation during its most tumultuous period.

About author
Cameron C Nickels

Cameron C. Nickels, Staunton, Virginia, is professor emeritus of English at James Madison University and is the author of New England Humor: From the Revolutionary War to the Civil War.



Reviews

Nickels, Cameron C. Civil War humor. University Press of Mississippi, 2010. 162p bibl index afp; ISBN 9781604737479. Reviewed in 2011feb CHOICE.

Nickels (James Madison Univ.) looks at humor (1861-65) in four topical areas: the Civil War presidents (Lincoln and Davis), the home front, the war itself, and race. He points out that Confederate humorists--though hampered by cheap paper, scarce ink, and mediocre engravers--found their leaders easy prey for irreverence, even travesty. Cowardice on the home front was an object of disdain; officers were butts of jokes by the lower orders (who suffered from serious deprivations of various sorts); the African American was freely travestied in looks and language. Interestingly, as Nickels convincingly documents, Northern humorists took roughly the same positions, targeting the same subjects and individuals even more egregiously than was typical in the South. The author provides thorough documentation, crowding his pages with potent graphics, plentiful anecdotes, and examples of doggerel verse--all uncovered in his research. Avoiding critical analysis and abstract theorizing, always a problem in discussions of humor, Nickels has amassed a trove of material focused on concrete objects. Readers who want to draw their own conclusions by immersion in primary materials will love this accessible presentation, which is valuable to audiences ranging from academic to casual (including Civil War buffs).

Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty; general readers. -- D. E. Sloane, University of New Haven

Copyright 2013 American Library Association.


 
  Help  

We choose eBOOKS!

Why choose Publishers Row eBooks?
About our eBooks
How to place the order
Using my account
Library Terms of Use Agreement
Current Special Offer
 
  MARC  
Download all MARC records  
  Special Offer Code  
Enter your Special Offer Code here:
  Search for  

  Our Products  
Browse all »»
Subversions of Verisimilitude
This Day in American History, 4th ed.
Virginia and State Rights, 17501861

We are very pleased with the diversity of titles in a cross section of disciplines.The titles [we purchased] are current and the subjects covered are highly relevant to our curriculum.

Prof. Van Viator,
MLIS, Head-Research Services; Ellender Memorial Library, Nicholls State University