Varda Books



 View book pages:
 Buy this book:
  eBookshuk
  




[ 225] from Hanukah

by Isaak Landman,
[ 225] from Hanukah, when round games are played. In Eastern Europe Christmas eve is called by the Jews Blinde Nacht ( blind night), perhaps because on that night the light of Torah- learning is extinguished. In such countries, Nittel was governed by the Russian calendar, in which Christmas falls about two weeks later. Lit.: Meyer, Karl, Der Aberglaube des Mittelalters ( 1884) 214. NIZER, LOUIS, lawyer and author, b. London, 1902. He was brought to the United States in 1905 and was educated in New York city, receiving his law degree from Columbia University in 1924. That same year he was admitted to the bar in New York. Spe-cializing in legal aspects of the film industry, Nizer was made executive secretary and attorney of the New York Film Board of Trade ( 1928); in 1942 he still held this position. He was also counsel for various motion picture companies in specific cases. He wrote New Courts of Industry ( 1935) and Thinking on Your Feet ( 1940). NOAH ( rest), the tenth in descent from Adam in the line of Seth, and son of Lamech. His story is told in Gen. 5: 28 to 9: 29. Lamech derived his sons name from the verb naham,  to comfort, in an ap־ parent play on words. His expression shows patheti-cally the degeneracy of Noahs time:  This same shall comfort us in our work and in the toil of our hands, which cometh from the ground which the Lord hath cursed ( Gen. 5: 29). Noah alone of his contempo-raries was  righteous and blameless, therefore he and his family alone were to be saved in the catastrophic punishment which God was to bring upon the world. A hundred years after the birth of his three sons the command came to build an ark, 300 cubits long, to bear safely above the deluge the eight persons of his family and a pair of every living species. A parallel account provides for seven of each kind of clean animal. Noah obeyed, and on the tenth day of the second month of Noahs 600th year the assemblage entered the ark. Seven days thereafter, and for forty days, the deluge raged to the height of fifteen cubits above the mountains. After 150 days the water abated, and the ark rested upon Mt. Ararat. To determine the degree of the waters recession, at seven day intervals Noah sent out a raven ( once) or a dove ( three times). A full year after the flood began the earth was dry once more. Upon disembarking, Noah erected an altar and offered sacrifices to God, Who in turn promised never again to inundate the earth or to disturb the seasons. A rainbow appeared in the heavens as a sign of the covenant. Noah received the laws against consuming animal blood and against the slaying of ones fellows. That the Noah- Flood story is probably derived from similar stories of other peoples in the ancient Near East has long been known. In the cuneiform inscrip-tions of Assyria and Babylonia, Noah corresponds to Xisuthrus ( Khasisadra), who learns of the waters abatement by the return of the birds a second time, then with clay on their feet. The twelve- part epic poem of Berosus, an Egyptian priest of the 3rd cent. B. C. E., contains a flood story in the eleventh part under the sign of Aquarius, the water- carrier. Here, NIZER NOAH Noah and the flood. From a painting deified Sit- Napishti or Khasisadra tells the story of the flood to his grandson Gisdubar. Ea, god of wisdom, reveals to Sit- Napishti the intention of the gods to bring about a flood. He commands him to build a ship to save what he can. The latter protests the absurdity of building a ship on dry land, but complies. The ship is completed and provisioned with the aid of Shamash, the sun- god, who fixes the season of flood the evening Sit- Napishti shuts the arks door. After the seventh day of flood the storm subsides. The patriarch steers the ship to Mt. Nizir, where the ark rests. He sends forth a dove, a swallow, and then a raven to determine the condition of the land. After leaving the ark he sacrifices to the gods. The rainbow of Anu is lighted up. Bel refuses to receive Sit- Napishtis sacrifice until palliated by the friendly Ea. Bel then makes a cove-nant with Sit- Napishti and his wife, who become gods, dwelling at the mouth of the river. Noahs latter days, according to the Bible, were spent in vine- growing, which on one occasion led to drunk-enness and the exposing of himself while he slept. Al-though Ham beheld his fathers shame, Shem and Japheth modestly covered him. For this, the two younger brothers received a parental blessing, whereas Ham, through his son Canaan, was cursed. Noah, the second father of the race, lived to be 950 years of age. His renown is attested during the Exile by reference to him along with Job and Daniel as a paragon of virtue ( Ezek. 14: 14, 20). A wealth of tradition was built around Noah in apocryphal and rabbinic literature. A pious, precocious child of angelic appearance, the legends tell, Noah prayed to God while still in the midwifes hands. Lamech consulted his father Methuselah, who in turn consulted his own father Enoch about the miracle. Enoch assured his grandson that Noah, the earths  consoler, would survive the flood ( Enoch 106 et seq.). Noah obtained his name only after his invention of farming implements had brought  rest to the land ( Midrash Haggadah, Gen. 5: 29). The same source states that Noah was born circumcised. While he was widely known as Noah, his father really named him  Menahem ( Sefer Hayashar, 1870, p. 56). Much rabbinic comment centers on Noahs right-eousness. Some hold that his virtue was hardly much in so corrupt a generation; others claim that his right-eousness was highly meritorious and would have been even more so in a more moral environment ( Sanh. 108a; Midrash Gen. 30: 10). It is explained that Noah THE UNIVERSAL JEWISH ENCYCLOPEDIA Chapter Home | Index AAR- AZU  | BAA- CAN | CAN- EDU | EDU- GNO | GOD- IZS | JAB- LEX | LEX- MOS  | MOS- PRO | PRO- SPE | SPI- ZYL

Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  
[ 225] from Hanukah, when round games are played. In Eastern Europe Christmas eve is called by the Jews Blinde Nacht ( blind night), perhaps because on that night the light of Torah- learning is extinguished. In such countries, Nittel was governed by the Russian calendar, in which Christmas falls about two weeks later. Lit.: Meyer, Karl, Der Aberglaube des Mittelalters ( 1884) 214. NIZER, LOUIS, lawyer and author, b. London, 1902. He was brought to the United States in 1905 and was educated in New York city, receiving his law degree from Columbia University in 1924. That same year he was admitted to the bar in New York. Spe-cializing in legal aspects of the film industry, Nizer was made executive secretary and attorney of the New York Film Board of Trade ( 1928); in 1942 he still held this position. He was also counsel for various motion picture companies in specific cases. He wrote New Courts of Industry ( 1935) and Thinking on Your Feet ( 1940). NOAH (\\" rest\\"), the tenth in descent from Adam in the line of Seth, and son of Lamech. His story is told in Gen. 5: 28 to 9: 29. Lamech derived his son's name from the verb naham, \\" to comfort,\\" in an ap־ parent play on words. His expression shows patheti-cally the degeneracy of Noah's time: \\" This same shall comfort us in our work and in the toil of our hands, which cometh from the ground which the Lord hath cursed\\" ( Gen. 5: 29). Noah alone of his contempo-raries was \\" righteous and blameless,\\" therefore he and his family alone were to be saved in the catastrophic punishment which God was to bring upon the world. A hundred years after the birth of his three sons the command came to build an ark, 300 cubits long, to bear safely above the deluge the eight persons of his family and a pair of every living species. A parallel account provides for seven of each kind of clean animal. Noah obeyed, and on the tenth day of the second month of Noah's 600th year the assemblage entered the ark. Seven days thereafter, and for forty days, the deluge raged to the height of fifteen cubits above the mountains. After 150 days the water abated, and the ark rested upon Mt. Ararat. To determine the degree of the water's recession, at seven day intervals Noah sent out a raven ( once) or a dove ( three times). A full year after the flood began the earth was dry once more. Upon disembarking, Noah erected an altar and offered sacrifices to God, Who in turn promised never again to inundate the earth or to disturb the seasons. A rainbow appeared in the heavens as a sign of the covenant. Noah received the laws against consuming animal blood and against the slaying of one's fellows. That the Noah- Flood story is probably derived from similar stories of other peoples in the ancient Near East has long been known. In the cuneiform inscrip-tions of Assyria and Babylonia, Noah corresponds to Xisuthrus ( Khasisadra), who learns of the water's abatement by the return of the birds a second time, then with clay on their feet. The twelve- part epic poem of Berosus, an Egyptian priest of the 3rd cent. B. C. E., contains a flood story in the eleventh part under the sign of Aquarius, the water- carrier. Here, NIZER NOAH Noah and the flood. From a painting deified Sit- Napishti or Khasisadra tells the story of the flood to his grandson Gisdubar. Ea, god of wisdom, reveals to Sit- Napishti the intention of the gods to bring about a flood. He commands him to build a ship to save what he can. The latter protests the absurdity of building a ship on dry land, but complies. The ship is completed and provisioned with the aid of Shamash, the sun- god, who fixes the season of flood the evening Sit- Napishti shuts the ark's door. After the seventh day of flood the storm subsides. The patriarch steers the ship to Mt. Nizir, where the ark rests. He sends forth a dove, a swallow, and then a raven to determine the condition of the land. After leaving the ark he sacrifices to the gods. The rainbow of Anu is lighted up. Bel refuses to receive Sit- Napishti's sacrifice until palliated by the friendly Ea. Bel then makes a cove-nant with Sit- Napishti and his wife, who become gods, dwelling at the mouth of the river. Noah's latter days, according to the Bible, were spent in vine- growing, which on one occasion led to drunk-enness and the exposing of himself while he slept. Al-though Ham beheld his father's shame, Shem and Japheth modestly covered him. For this, the two younger brothers received a parental blessing, whereas Ham, through his son Canaan, was cursed. Noah, the second father of the race, lived to be 950 years of age. His renown is attested during the Exile by reference to him along with Job and Daniel as a paragon of virtue ( Ezek. 14: 14, 20). A wealth of tradition was built around Noah in apocryphal and rabbinic literature. A pious, precocious child of angelic appearance, the legends tell, Noah prayed to God while still in the midwife's hands. Lamech consulted his father Methuselah, who in turn consulted his own father Enoch about the miracle. Enoch assured his grandson that Noah, the earth's \\" consoler,\\" would survive the flood ( Enoch 106 et seq.). Noah obtained his name only after his invention of farming implements had brought \\" rest\\" to the land ( Midrash Haggadah, Gen. 5: 29). The same source states that Noah was born circumcised. While he was widely known as Noah, his father really named him \\" Menahem\\" ( Sefer Hayashar, 1870, p. 56). Much rabbinic comment centers on Noah's right-eousness. Some hold that his virtue was hardly much in so corrupt a generation; others claim that his right-eousness was highly meritorious and would have been even more so in a more moral environment ( Sanh. 108a; Midrash Gen. 30: 10). It is explained that Noah THE UNIVERSAL JEWISH ENCYCLOPEDIA << Chapter >> Home | Index AAR- AZU | BAA- CAN | CAN- EDU | EDU- GNO | GOD- IZS | JAB- LEX | LEX- MOS | MOS- PRO | PRO- SPE | SPI- ZYL
Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  

Varda Books - 1-59045-933-4-8


 Already viewed books:
Volume 8, The Universal Jewish EncyclopediaVolume 8, The Universal Jewish Encyclopedia


TANAKH - INTERACTIVE HEBREW BIBLE