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Jewish Society 161 JEWS

by Jose Hinojosa Montalvo
Jewish Society 161 JEWS, CHRISTIANS A N D MUSLIMS: THREE CLOSELY CONNECTED SOCIAL GROUPS Although the Jews formed a complete society, they could not remain enclosed in the limited frames of their Jewish quarters; they needed wider horizons, above all for professional reasons. At the same time, they resided preferentially in an urban and Christian milieu where daily contact between members of both religions was inevitable. And this is also true of contact with the Moors in the rural areas or in those localities with a Moorish quarter. These were very intensive relations, as demonstrated by the actual segregational dispositions which we have analyzed in another section, and they embraced all spheres of daily life — even gambling, for example, of which the Jews were very fond,  and some practiced it in  la christiandat ( in the Christian quarters). 1 Jews and Christians also had professional relations; most frequent were commercial operations of every kind, which we shall analyze in the section devoted to Jewish commerce. Purchase and sale of all kinds of products by Christians and Jews was current. At times artisan works were contracted, as in 1432 when Pedro Bertos, skin- dealer of Valencia, gave to Astruch Cabalmale, of Castellón, a leather garment to sew and finish, but the Jew left Valencia without advising Bertos and without  paying the 11 florins which he owed him, and was thus sought judicially. 2 Many Jew leased houses to Christians; Samuel Suxen, of Morvedre, for instance, in 1401 leased a  house for one year to Juan Gonzalo, weaver of Valencia, for 12 florins. 3 Christian — often Converso — procurators were frequently appointed by Jews, in order to recover debts or properties, to represent them in trials, etc. The greatest number of such powers of attorney given by Morvedre Jews, is recorded in the ten years following the riots against the Jewish quarters. Conversos were at times chosen for this mission, as we have said. 4 1 ARV, Bailia, 1147. fol. 132r. In 16th March 1430, the baile general prohibited the justicia of Morvedre from proceeding against a Jew accused of  playing dice with the Christians, since this was not in his jurisdiction. See doc. 376. 2 ARV, Bailia 1147, fol. 372v. See doc. 394. 3 ARV, Protocolos notariales, n° 1446. Without  folio number. October 20th 1401. 4 E. g. ARV, Protocolos  notariales, n° 1445. Without folio number. January 14th 1399.  See doc. 256. Chapter Home | TOC 9 | Index 9 t t t t

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Jewish Society 161 JEWS, CHRISTIANS A N D MUSLIMS: THREE CLOSELY CONNECTED SOCIAL GROUPS Although the Jews formed a complete society, they could not remain enclosed in the limited frames of their Jewish quarters; they needed wider horizons, above all for professional reasons. At the same time, they resided preferentially in an urban and Christian milieu where daily contact between members of both religions was inevitable. And this is also true of contact with the Moors in the rural areas or in those localities with a Moorish quarter. These were very intensive relations, as demonstrated by the actual segregational dispositions which we have analyzed in another section, and they embraced all spheres of daily life — even gambling, for example, of which the Jews were very fond, and some practiced it in \\" la christiandat\\" ( in the Christian quarters). 1 Jews and Christians also had professional relations; most frequent were commercial operations of every kind, which we shall analyze in the section devoted to Jewish commerce. Purchase and sale of all kinds of products by Christians and Jews was current. At times artisan works were contracted, as in 1432 when Pedro Bertos, skin- dealer of Valencia, gave to Astruch Cabalmale, of Castellón, a leather garment to sew and finish, but the Jew left Valencia without advising Bertos and without paying the 11 florins which he owed him, and was thus sought judicially. 2 Many Jew leased houses to Christians; Samuel Suxen, of Morvedre, for instance, in 1401 leased a house for one year to Juan Gonzalo, weaver of Valencia, for 12 florins. 3 Christian — often Converso — procurators were frequently appointed by Jews, in order to recover debts or properties, to represent them in trials, etc. The greatest number of such powers of attorney given by Morvedre Jews, is recorded in the ten years following the riots against the Jewish quarters. Conversos were at times chosen for this mission, as we have said. 4 1 ARV, Bailia, 1147. fol. 132r. In 16th March 1430, the baile general prohibited the justicia of Morvedre from proceeding against a Jew accused of playing dice with the Christians, since this was not in his jurisdiction. See doc. 376. 2 ARV, Bailia 1147, fol. 372v. See doc. 394. 3 ARV, Protocolos notariales, n° 1446. Without folio number. October 20th 1401. 4 E. g. ARV, Protocolos notariales, n° 1445. Without folio number. January 14th 1399. See doc. 256. << Chapter >> Home | TOC 9 | Index 9 t t t t
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