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THE JEWISH ENCYCLOPEDIA

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THE JEWISH ENCYCLOPEDIA 388 Germany, whither he went in 1848; so that after two years of touring he decided to return to Paris, where he succeeded in obtaining the position of leader at the Theatre Français. Offenbach now began to devote himself to ope-ratic composition, and achieved his first success with his “ Chanson de Fortunio” ( in Alfred de Mus-set’s “ Le Chandelier”) in 1848. On Oct. 28, 1858, his first ope-retta, “ Pepito,” was produced at the Opé-ra Comique, but with slight success, and it was not until “ Les Deux Aveugles” and “ Le Violoneux” appe-ared that Offenbach’s peculiar talent met with unequivocal rec-ognition. In 1855 he opened a theater of his own, the Bouffes Parisiennes ( formerly the Théâtre Comte, in the Passage Choi-seul), which he con-ducted until 1866, and in which many of his most popular works appeared. In 1872 Offenbach under-took the management of the Theatre de la Gaîté, which, however, he resigned in 1876, when he en-tered upon a somewhat unsuccessful tour through America ( this tour is described in his “ Notes d’un Musicien en Voyage,” 2d ed., Paris, 1877). From the time of his return to Paris until his death he diligently devoted himself to composi-tion. He was a very prolific composer, his operat-ic and other productions comprising over 102 in-dependent works, many of which are in three or four acts. His best works are: “ Orphée aux Enfers” ( 1858), an operetta, which by 1875 had had 400 performances in Paris alone; “ La Belle Hélène” ( 1864); “ Barbe- Bleu” and “ La Vie Parisienne” ( 1866); “ La Grande Duchesse de Gerolstein,” which created a great sensation during the Paris Exhibition of 1867; “ Madame Favart” ( 1879). BIBLIOGRAPHY: Fétis, Biographie Universelle des Musiciens, Supple-ment, ii. 284; Revue et Gazette Musicale de Paris, 1864 and 1866; Grove, Dictionary of Music and Musicians; Baker, Biographi-cal Dictionary of Musicians. S. J. SO. OFFENHAUSEN, SOLOMON ZEBI. See BRENZ, SAMUEL FRIEDRICH. OFFERING. See SACRIFICE. OG.— Biblical Data: Amorite king of Bashan, who reigned in Ashtaroth and was conquered by Moses and Israel in the battle of Edrei ( Num. xxi. 33), sixty fortified cities, with high walls, gates, and bars, comprising the region of Argob, being taken and given to the children of Machir, son of Manasseh ( Deut. iii. 13; Josh. xiii. 31). Og was one of the giants of the remnant of the Rephaim. His iron bedstead in Rabbath, the capital of Ammon, is described as having been nine cubits in length and four cubits in breadth ( Deut. iii. 11). E. G. H. E. SCHR. —— In Rabbinical Literature: Og was not des-troyed at the time of the Flood ( Niddah 61a), for, according to one legend, the waters reached only to his ankles ( Midr. Petirat Mosheh, i. 128, in Jellinek, “ B. H.” ii.). Another tradition states that he fled to Palestine, where there was no flood ( Rashi to Nid-dah, ad loc.); while, according to a third legend, he sat on a rung of the ladder outside the ark, and, af-ter he had sworn to be a slave to Noah and his chil-dren, received his food each day through a hole made in the side of the ark ( Pirke R. El. ch. xxiii.). Og was known also as “ Ha- Palit” ( see Gen. xiv. 13). It was Og who brought the news to Abraham of the captivity of Lot. This he did, however, with an evil motive, for he thought that Abraham would seek to release Lot and would be killed in battle with the great kings, and that he, Og, would be able to marry the beautiful Sarah ( Gen. R. xlii. 12). A long lease of life was granted him as a reward for informing Abraham, but because of his sinister motive he was destined to be killed by the de-scendants of Abraham. Og was present at the ban-quet which Abraham gave on the day Isaac was weaned ( comp. Gen. xxi. 8). As Og had always de-clared that Abraham would beget no children, the guests teasingly asked him what he had to say now that Abraham had begotten Isaac, whereupon Og answered that Isaac was no true descendant since he could kill Isaac with one finger. It was in punishment for this remark, one legend declares, that he was condemned to live to see a hundred thousand descendants of Abraham and to be killed in battle against them ( Gen. R. liii. 14). When Jacob went to Pharaoh and blessed him ( Gen. xlvii. 7), Og was present, and the king said to him: “ The grandson of Abraham, who, according to thy words, was to have no descendants, is now here with seventy of them.” As Og cast an evil eye upon the children of Israel, God foretold that he would fall into their hands ( Deut. R. i. 22). During the battle of Edrei ( Num. xxi. 33) Og sat on the city wall, his legs, which were eighteen ells long, reaching down to the ground; Moses did not know what monster he had before him until God told him that it was Og. Og hurled an entire moun-tain against the Israelites, but Moses intercepted it ( Deut. R. l. c.). According to another legend, Og uprooted a mountain three miles long, intending to destroy all Israel at once by hurling it upon their camp, which was also three miles in length; but while he was carrying it upon his head a swarm of locusts burrowed through it, so that it fell round his neck. When he attempted to throw off this un-wieldy necklace long teeth grew from both sides of his month and kept the mountain in place. There-upon Moses, who was himself ten ells tall, took an ax of equal length, jumped up-ward ten ells, so that he could reach Og’s ankles, and thus killed him ( Ber. 54b). Shabbat ( 151b) and ‘ Erubin ( 48a) also indicate that Og was regarded as an unusually large giant. A legend says that a grave- digger pursued a stag three miles inside of one of Og’s bones without reaching the other end ( Niddah 24b). W. B. J. Z. L. Jacques Offenbach. Death of Og. Offenbach OhalotAac— Apo  | Apo— Ben  | Ben— Cha | Cha— Dre | Dre— Goa | God— Ist | Ita— Leo | Leo— Mor | Mor— Phi | Phi— Sam | Sam— Tal | Tal— Zwe   P  a g   V  ie w Search  | F i n d  | H o m e | I n d e x   P  a g   V  ie w

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THE JEWISH ENCYCLOPEDIA 388 Germany, whither he went in 1848; so that after two years of touring he decided to return to Paris, where he succeeded in obtaining the position of leader at the Theatre Français. Offenbach now began to devote himself to ope-ratic composition, and achieved his first success with his “ Chanson de Fortunio” ( in Alfred de Mus-set’s “ Le Chandelier”) in 1848. On Oct. 28, 1858, his first ope-retta, “ Pepito,” was produced at the Opé-ra Comique, but with slight success, and it was not until “ Les Deux Aveugles” and “ Le Violoneux” appe-ared that Offenbach’s peculiar talent met with unequivocal rec-ognition. In 1855 he opened a theater of his own, the Bouffes Parisiennes ( formerly the Théâtre Comte, in the Passage Choi-seul), which he con-ducted until 1866, and in which many of his most popular works appeared. In 1872 Offenbach under-took the management of the Theatre de la Gaîté, which, however, he resigned in 1876, when he en-tered upon a somewhat unsuccessful tour through America ( this tour is described in his “ Notes d’un Musicien en Voyage,” 2d ed., Paris, 1877). From the time of his return to Paris until his death he diligently devoted himself to composi-tion. He was a very prolific composer, his operat-ic and other productions comprising over 102 in-dependent works, many of which are in three or four acts. His best works are: “ Orphée aux Enfers” ( 1858), an operetta, which by 1875 had had 400 performances in Paris alone; “ La Belle Hélène” ( 1864); “ Barbe- Bleu” and “ La Vie Parisienne” ( 1866); “ La Grande Duchesse de Gerolstein,” which created a great sensation during the Paris Exhibition of 1867; “ Madame Favart” ( 1879). BIBLIOGRAPHY: Fétis, Biographie Universelle des Musiciens, Supple-ment, ii. 284; Revue et Gazette Musicale de Paris, 1864 and 1866; Grove, Dictionary of Music and Musicians; Baker, Biographi-cal Dictionary of Musicians. S. J. SO. OFFENHAUSEN, SOLOMON ZEBI. See BRENZ, SAMUEL FRIEDRICH. OFFERING. See SACRIFICE. OG.— Biblical Data: Amorite king of Bashan, who reigned in Ashtaroth and was conquered by Moses and Israel in the battle of Edrei ( Num. xxi. 33), sixty fortified cities, with high walls, gates, and bars, comprising the region of Argob, being taken and given to the children of Machir, son of Manasseh ( Deut. iii. 13; Josh. xiii. 31). Og was one of the giants of the remnant of the Rephaim. His iron bedstead in Rabbath, the capital of Ammon, is described as having been nine cubits in length and four cubits in breadth ( Deut. iii. 11). E. G. H. E. SCHR. —— In Rabbinical Literature: Og was not des-troyed at the time of the Flood ( Niddah 61a), for, according to one legend, the waters reached only to his ankles ( Midr. Petirat Mosheh, i. 128, in Jellinek, “ B. H.” ii.). Another tradition states that he fled to Palestine, where there was no flood ( Rashi to Nid-dah, ad loc.); while, according to a third legend, he sat on a rung of the ladder outside the ark, and, af-ter he had sworn to be a slave to Noah and his chil-dren, received his food each day through a hole made in the side of the ark ( Pirke R. El. ch. xxiii.). Og was known also as “ Ha- Palit” ( see Gen. xiv. 13). It was Og who brought the news to Abraham of the captivity of Lot. This he did, however, with an evil motive, for he thought that Abraham would seek to release Lot and would be killed in battle with the great kings, and that he, Og, would be able to marry the beautiful Sarah ( Gen. R. xlii. 12). A long lease of life was granted him as a reward for informing Abraham, but because of his sinister motive he was destined to be killed by the de-scendants of Abraham. Og was present at the ban-quet which Abraham gave on the day Isaac was weaned ( comp. Gen. xxi. 8). As Og had always de-clared that Abraham would beget no children, the guests teasingly asked him what he had to say now that Abraham had begotten Isaac, whereupon Og answered that Isaac was no true descendant since he could kill Isaac with one finger. It was in punishment for this remark, one legend declares, that he was condemned to live to see a hundred thousand descendants of Abraham and to be killed in battle against them ( Gen. R. liii. 14). When Jacob went to Pharaoh and blessed him ( Gen. xlvii. 7), Og was present, and the king said to him: “ The grandson of Abraham, who, according to thy words, was to have no descendants, is now here with seventy of them.” As Og cast an evil eye upon the children of Israel, God foretold that he would fall into their hands ( Deut. R. i. 22). During the battle of Edrei ( Num. xxi. 33) Og sat on the city wall, his legs, which were eighteen ells long, reaching down to the ground; Moses did not know what monster he had before him until God told him that it was Og. Og hurled an entire moun-tain against the Israelites, but Moses intercepted it ( Deut. R. l. c.). According to another legend, Og uprooted a mountain three miles long, intending to destroy all Israel at once by hurling it upon their camp, which was also three miles in length; but while he was carrying it upon his head a swarm of locusts burrowed through it, so that it fell round his neck. When he attempted to throw off this un-wieldy necklace long teeth grew from both sides of his month and kept the mountain in place. There-upon Moses, who was himself ten ells tall, took an ax of equal length, jumped up-ward ten ells, so that he could reach Og’s ankles, and thus killed him ( Ber. 54b). Shabbat ( 151b) and ‘ Erubin ( 48a) also indicate that Og was regarded as an unusually large giant. A legend says that a grave- digger pursued a stag three miles inside of one of Og’s bones without reaching the other end ( Niddah 24b). W. B. J. Z. L. Jacques Offenbach. Death of Og. Offenbach Ohalot Aac— Apo | Apo— Ben | Ben— Cha | Cha— Dre | Dre— Goa | God— Ist | Ita— Leo | Leo— Mor | Mor— Phi | Phi— Sam | Sam— Tal | Tal— Zwe < < P a g e > > < < V ie w >> Search | F i n d | H o m e | I n d e x < < P a g e > > < < V ie w >>
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