Varda Books



 View book pages:
 Buy this book:
  eBookshuk
  




CHAPTER III SYNAGOGUE

by Salo W. Baron
CHAPTER III SYNAGOGUE FTER the fall of Jerusalem, the Jewish communities on Babylonian soil had more than one precedent to guide them in reconstructing their shattered national exis-tence. National minorities transplanted to foreign soil had existed in the ancient Near East long before the Assyrians made it a practice to shift entire populations. As far back as the end of the third millenium we find, for example, in Kültepe ( Asia Minor) a large colony of Assyrian merchants organized in an effective self- governing community, living under their own law and their own elected or appointed leaders. They retained for long a large measure of indepen-dence with respect to both the government of the country in which they lived and the central authorities at home. Later, Phoenician and Greek groups of merchants or mercenaries were to be found in many Mediterranean cities, even some in which the mother country had no political influence whatsoever. Although at first distinguished from all these alien colonies by the lack of a powerful mother country, the Babylonian Jewish community could utilize a millennial experience in adapting itself to new situations and in evolving new organizational forms. That some of these combinations of old and new forms were altogether unique, and that they ultimately revealed an elasticity and adaptability to chang-ing environment which far exceeded all those known to men 55 A   C h a p t e r Home  | T O C For use on stand- alone, non- institutional computers only. To purchase Scholar PDF version with advanced functionality, go to www. publishersrow. com

Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  
CHAPTER III SYNAGOGUE FTER the fall of Jerusalem, the Jewish communities on Babylonian soil had more than one precedent to guide them in reconstructing their shattered national exis-tence. National minorities transplanted to foreign soil had existed in the ancient Near East long before the Assyrians made it a practice to shift entire populations. As far back as the end of the third millenium we find, for example, in Kültepe ( Asia Minor) a large colony of Assyrian merchants organized in an effective self- governing community, living under their own law and their own elected or appointed leaders. They retained for long a large measure of indepen-dence with respect to both the government of the country in which they lived and the central authorities at home. Later, Phoenician and Greek groups of merchants or mercenaries were to be found in many Mediterranean cities, even some in which the mother country had no political influence whatsoever. Although at first distinguished from all these alien colonies by the lack of a powerful mother country, the Babylonian Jewish community could utilize a millennial experience in adapting itself to new situations and in evolving new organizational forms. That some of these combinations of old and new forms were altogether unique, and that they ultimately revealed an elasticity and adaptability to chang-ing environment which far exceeded all those known to men 55 A < < C h a p t e r >> Home | T O C For use on stand- alone, non- institutional computers only. To purchase Scholar PDF version with advanced functionality, go to www. publishersrow. com
Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  

Varda Books - 1-59045-193-7


 Already viewed books:
The Jewish Community: Its History and Structure to the American Revolution. Vol. I.The Jewish Community: Its History and Structure to the American Revolution. Vol. I.


TANAKH - INTERACTIVE HEBREW BIBLE