Varda Books



 View book pages:
 Buy this book:
  eBookshuk
  




CHAPTER IX LOCAL SOCIETY

by Salo W. Baron
CHAPTER IX LOCAL SOCIETY O THESE various forms of provincial or nation- wide supercommunal control may be contrasted numerous smaller societies ( hebrot), especially those which constituted mere subdivisions of local communities. Where, as in the larger Turkish communities after the mass immigration of Spanish- Portuguese refugees, there existed no fully organ-ized and unified local community, voluntary associations often served as unifying links among disparate congrega-tions. The famous Talmud Torah association of Salonica, for instance, with a building which housed educational institutions from grammar school to academy, was, from its foundation in 1520, the center of many community- wide undertakings. Thirteen individual congregations, including ten founded by refugees from Spain, Portugal and southern Italy in the difficult years between 1492 and 1535, served more specific needs. Memorial services for distinguished leaders and other city- wide assemblies were held in the Talmud Torah. Moses Almosnino there submitted his re-port on negotiations undertaken with the Porte on be-half of the entire community. So proud were the Salonican Jews of their educational institution, which in more than one respect anticipated the best of the American Jewish center, that one sixteenth- century rabbi, Isaac Adribi, claimed that “ even those inhabiting distant lands have their eyes and hearts turned toward” it. Indeed, legacies were 348 T   C h a p t e r Home  | T O C For use on stand- alone, non- institutional computers only. To purchase Scholar PDF version with advanced functionality, go to www. publishersrow. com

Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  
CHAPTER IX LOCAL SOCIETY O THESE various forms of provincial or nation- wide supercommunal control may be contrasted numerous smaller societies ( hebrot), especially those which constituted mere subdivisions of local communities. Where, as in the larger Turkish communities after the mass immigration of Spanish- Portuguese refugees, there existed no fully organ-ized and unified local community, voluntary associations often served as unifying links among disparate congrega-tions. The famous Talmud Torah association of Salonica, for instance, with a building which housed educational institutions from grammar school to academy, was, from its foundation in 1520, the center of many community- wide undertakings. Thirteen individual congregations, including ten founded by refugees from Spain, Portugal and southern Italy in the difficult years between 1492 and 1535, served more specific needs. Memorial services for distinguished leaders and other city- wide assemblies were held in the Talmud Torah. Moses Almosnino there submitted his re-port on negotiations undertaken with the Porte on be-half of the entire community. So proud were the Salonican Jews of their educational institution, which in more than one respect anticipated the best of the American Jewish center, that one sixteenth- century rabbi, Isaac Adribi, claimed that “ even those inhabiting distant lands have their eyes and hearts turned toward” it. Indeed, legacies were 348 T < < C h a p t e r >> Home | T O C For use on stand- alone, non- institutional computers only. To purchase Scholar PDF version with advanced functionality, go to www. publishersrow. com
Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  

Varda Books - 1-59045-193-7


 Already viewed books:
The Jewish Community: Its History and Structure to the American Revolution. Vol. I.The Jewish Community: Its History and Structure to the American Revolution. Vol. I.


TANAKH - INTERACTIVE HEBREW BIBLE