The International Critical Commentary (ICC):...

An electronic edition of Skinner's main work.

C h a p t e r Home  | T O C  | I n d e x considerably emphasised in the third edition, the first part of which ( 1909) was published just too late to be utilised for this volume. That I have not neglected the older standard commentaries of Tuch, Delitzsch, and Dillmann, or less comprehensive expositions like that of Strack, will be apparent from the frequent acknowledgments in the notes. The same remark applies to many books of a more general kind ( mostly cited in the list of “ Abbreviations”), which have helped to elucidate special points of exegesis. The problems which invest the interpretation of Genesis are, indeed, too varied and far- reaching to be satisfactorily treated within the compass of a single volume. The old controversies as to the compatibility of the earlier chapters with the conclusions of modern science are no longer, to my mind, a living issue; and I have not thought it neces-sary to occupy much space with their discussion. Those who are of a different opinion may be referred to the pages of Dr. Driver, where they will find these matters handled with convincing force and clearness. Rather more atten-tion has been given to the recent reaction against the critical analysis of the Pentateuch, although I am very far from thinking that that movement, either in its conservative or its more radical manifestation, is likely to undo the scholarly work of the last hundred and fifty years. At all events, my own belief in the essential soundness of the prevalent hypothesis has been confirmed by the renewed examination of the text of Genesis which my present under-taking required. It will probably appear to some that the analysis is pushed further than is warranted, and that dupli-cates are discovered where common sense would have suggested an easy reconciliation. That is a perfectly fair line of criticism, provided the whole problem be kept in view. It has to be remembered that the analytic process is a chain which is a good deal stronger than its weakest link, that it starts from cases where diversity of authorship is almost incontrovertible, and moves on to others where it is less certain; and it is surely evident that when the composition of sources is once established, the slightest viii PREFACE

The International Critical Commentary (ICC): GENESIS


About Book The International Critical Commentary (ICC): GENESIS

Front MatterDedication PageTitle PageCopyright PagePREFACE TO FIRST EDITIONCONTENTSList of AbbreviationsIntroduction§ 1. Name, Canonical Position, and General Scope of the BookA. The Narrative Material of Genesis.§ 2. History or Legend?.§ 3. Myth and Legend—Foreign Myths—Types of Mythical Motive§ 4. Style and Form of the Legends—Prose or Poetry?§ 5. Preservation and Collection of the Legends§ 6. Historical Aspects of the Tradition1. The historical background of the patriarchal traditions.2. Ethnographic theories.3. The patriarchs as historical figures.B. Structure and Composition of the Book.§ 7. The Critical Analysis§ 8. Composite Structure of J and E—Individuals or Schools?§ 9. Characteristics of J and E—their Relation to Prophecy§ 10. Date and Place of Origin—Redaction of JE§ 11. The Priestly Code and the Final Redaction1. Historical outlook.2. Religious and theological conceptions.3. Literary style and phraseology.§ 12. Plan and Divisions of the BookCommentaryCHS. I–XI - THE PRIMÆVAL HISTORY.I. 1–II. 3.—Creation of the World in Six Days: Institution of the Sabbath.I.1.I.2. Description of Chaos.I.3–5. First work: Creation of light.I.6–8. Second work: The firmament.I.9, I.10. Third work: Dry land and sea.I.11–13. Fourth work: Creation of plants.I.14–19. Fifth work: The heavenly luminaries.I.20–23. Sixth work: Aquatic and aërial animals.I.24, 25. Seventh work: Terrestrial animals.I.26–28. Eighth work: Creation of man.I.29–31.II. 1–3. The rest of God.II.4a.II. 4b–III. 24.—The Creation and Fall of Man (J).II.4b–7.—The creation of man.II.8–17. The garden of Eden.II.18–25. Creation of animals and woman.III. 1–7. The temptation.III.8–13. The inquest.III.14, 15. The curse on the serpentIII.16. The doom of the woman:III.17–19. The man's sentence.III.20–24. The expulsion from Eden.III.22–24. The actual expulsion.Ch. IV.—Beginnings of History and Civilisation.IV. 1–16.—Cain and Abel.1–5. Birth of Cain and Abel: their occupation, and sacrifice.6–12. Warning, murder, and sentence.13–16. Mitigation of Cain's punishment.IV. 17–24.—The line of Cain.17. Enoch and the building of the first city.19. The two wives of Lamech.20–22. The sons of Lamech and their occupations.23, 24. The song of Lamech.IV. 25, 26.—Fragmentary Sethite Genealogy.Ch. V.—The Ante-Diluvian Patriarchs (P).1, 2.—Introduction:3–5. Adam.6–8. Šeth21–24. The account of Enoch25–27. Methuselah.32. The abnormal age of NoahVI. 1–4.—The Origin of the Nôphîlîm.3. A divine sentence on the human race,4. The Nephîlîm were (or arose) in the earth in those days]VI. 5–IX. 29.—Noah and the Flood.The Flood according to J.VI. 5–8. The occasion of the Flood:VII. 1–5. Announcement of the Flood.VII.7–10, 12, 16b, 17b, 22, 23.—Entrance into the ark and description of the Flood.VIII. (1b?), 2b, 3a, (4?), 6–12, 13b. Subsidence of the waters.VIII.20–22. Noah's sacrifice.The Flood according to P.VI. 9–12. Noah's piety; The corruption of the earth.VI.13–16. Directions for building the ark.VI.17–22. The purpose of the ark.VII. 6, 11, 13–17a. Commencement of the Flood.VII.18–21, 24. Magnitude and effect of the Flood.VIII. 1, 2a, 3b–5, 13a, 14. Abatement of the Flood.VIII.15–19. Exit from the ark: blessing on the animals.IX. 1–7. The new world-order.IX.8–17. The Covenant and its Sign.IX.28, 29. The death of Noah.IX. 18–27.—Noah as Vine-grower: His Curse and Blessing (J).CH. X.—The Table of Peoples (P and J).The Table of P.1a. Superscription.2–5. The Japhetic or Northern Peoples:6, 7, 20. The Hamitic or Southern Group:22, 23, 31. The Shemitic or Eastern Group.The Table of J.IX. 18a, X. 1b. Introduction.8–12. Nimrod and his empire.13, 14.—The sons of Mizraim.15–19. The Canaanites.21, 24, 25–30. The Shemites.XI. 1–9.—The Tower of Babel (J).1–4. The Building of the City and the Tower.5–9. Yahwe's Interposition.XI. 10–26.—The Genealogy of Shem (P).XI. 27–32.—The Genealogy of Terah (P and J).CHS. XII–XXV.18 - THE PATRIARCHAL HISTORY. ABRAHAM.Chs. XII, XIII.—The migrations of Abram (J and P).XII. 1–8. The journey to Canaan and the promise of the Land.XII. 9–XIII. 1.—Abram in Egypt.XIII.2–18. Separation of Abram and Lot.Ch. XIV.—Abram's Victory over Four Kings.1–4. The revolt of the five kings.5–7. The preliminary campaign.8–12. The final battle, and capture of Lot.13–16. Abram's pursuit and victory.17, 18–20. Abram and Melkizedek.17, 21–24. Abram and the king of Sodom.Ch. XV.—God's Covenant with Abram (JE).1–6. The promise of an heir (J), and a numerous posterity (E).7–21. The covenant.Ch. XVI.—The Flight of Hagar and Birth of Ishmael (J and P).1–6. The flight of Hagar.7–14. The theophany at the well.Ch. XVII.—The Covenant of Circumcision (P).1–8. The Covenant-promises.9–14. The sign of the Covenant.15–22. The heir of the Covenant.23–27. Circumcision of Abraham's household.Ch. XVIII. The Theophany at Hebron: Abraham's Intercession for Sodom (J). .1–8. The entertainment of the three wayfarers.9–15. The promise of a son to Sarah.16–22a. The judgement of Sodom revealed.22b–33. Abraham's intercession.XIX. 1–29.—The Destruction of Sodom and Deliverance of Lot (J and P).1–3. Lot's hospitality.4–11. The assault of the Sodomites.12–16. The deliverance of Lot.17–22. The sparing of Zoar.23–28. The catastrophe.XIX. 30–38.—Lot and his Daughters (J).Ch. XX.— Abraham and Sarah at the Court of Gerar Abraham and Sarah at the Court of Gerar (E).1, 2. Introductory notice.3–7. Abimelech's dream.8–13. Abimelech and Abraham.14–18. Abimelech makes reparation to Abraham.XXI. 1–21.—Birth of Isaac and Expulsion of Ishmael1–7. The birth of Isaac.8–10. Sarah demands the ejection of Ishmael.11–13. Abraham's misgivings removed.14–16. Mother and child in the desert.17–19. The Divine succour20, 21. Ishmael's career.XXI. 22–34.—Abraham's Covenant with Abimelech (E and J).Ch. XXII. 1–19.—The Sacrifice of Isaac (E and R.JE ).1–8. Abraham's willing preparation for the sacrifice. —9–14. The sacrifice averted.15–19. Renewal of the promises: Conclusion.XXII. 20–24.—The Sons of Nahôr (J, R).Ch. XXIII. Purchase of the Cave of Machpelah (P).1, 2. The death of Sarah.3–7. The request for a burying-place.8–12. The appeal to >Ephrôn.13–16. The purchase of the field.17–20. Summary and conclusion.Ch. XXIV.—Procuring a Wife for Isaac (J, [E?]).1–9. The servant's commission10–14. The servant at the well.15–27. The servant and Rebekah.28–32. Laban's hospitality33–49. The servant's narrative.50–61. Departure of Rebekah, with the consent and blessing of her relatives.62–67. The home-bringing of Rebekah.XXV. 1–6.—The Sons of Keturah (J? R?).XXV. 7–11.—The Death and Burial of Abraham (P).XXV. 12–18.—The Genealogy and Death of Ishmael (P).CHS. XXV. 19–XXXVI. - THE HISTORY OF JACOBXXV. 19–34.—The Birth of Esau and Jacob, and the Transference of the Birthright (P, JE).19, 20. Isaac's marriage.21–23. The pre-natal oracle.24–26. Birth and naming of the twins.27, 28. Their manner of life.29–34. Esau parts with the birthright.Ch. XXVI.—Isaac and the Philistines (J, R, P).1–6. Isaac migrates to Gerar.7–11. Rebekah's honour compromised.12–16.—Isaac's successful husbandry.17–22. Isaac's wells.23–25. The theophany at Beersheba.26–33. The treaty with Abimelech.34, 35. Esau's Hittite wivesXXVII. 1–45.—How Jacob secured his Father's Blessing (JE).1–5. Isaac's purpose to bless Esau:6–17. Rebekah's stratagem.18–29. Jacob obtains the blessing.30–40. Esau sues in vain for a blessing.41–45. Esau's purpose of revenge.XXVII. 46–XXVIII. 9.—Isaac's Charge to Jacob (P).XXVIII. 10–22.— Jacob at Bethel Jacob at Bethel (JE).10–12 (E). Jacob's dream.13–16 (J). The promise.17–19. Consecration and naming of the place.20–22 (E). Jacob's vow.XXIX. 1–30.— Jacob's Marriage with Laban's Daughters Jacob's Marriage with Laban's Daughters (JE, P).1–14. Jacob's meeting with Rachel.15–30. Jacob's double marriage.XXIX. 31–XXX. 24.—The Birth of Jacob's Children (JE).31–35. The sons of Leah.XXX. 1–8. Rachel's adopted sons.9–13. Leah's adopted sons.14–24. The later children.XXX. 25–43.— Jacob enriched at Laban's Expense Jacob enriched at Laban's Expense (JE).25–31. Jacob proposes to provide for his own house.32–36. The new contract.37–43. Jacob's stratagem.XXXI. 1–XXXII. 1.—Jacob's Flight from Laban: their friendly Parting (J, E).1–16. Preparations for flight.17–25. The flight and pursuit.26–43. The altercation.44–54. The treaty of Gilead.XXXII. 2–33.—Jacob's Measures for propitiating Esau: His Wrestling with the Deity at Peniel (J, E).2, 3. The legend of Mahhanaim.4–14a. Jacob's precautionary measures (J).14b-22. The present for Esau23–33. The wrestling at Peniel (JE).Ch. XXXIII.—The Meeting of the Brothers: Jacob's March to Shechem (JE, P)1–7. The meeting.8–11. The present.12–17. The parting.18–20. Jacob at Shechem.Ch. XXXIV.—The Outrage on Dinah.1–12. Dinah is seduced by Shechem, and afterwards sought in marriage.13–17. The answer.18–24. The condition accepted.25–31. The vengeance of the Hebrews.Ch. XXXV.— Jacob in Canaan Jacob in Canaan (E, J, P).1–8 + 14. Bethel re-visited: the death of Deborah.9, 10. Jacob's name changed (P).6a, 11–13, 15. The blessing transmitted to Jacob:16–20. Rachel dies in child-birth (E).21, 22a. Reuben's incest (J).22b–26. A list of Jacob's sons (P).27–29. The death of Isaac (P).Ch. XXXVI. Edomite Genealogies, etc. (partly P).1–5. Esau's wives and sons.6–8. Esau's migration to Se>ir.9–14. The genealogy of Esau.15–19. The clan-chiefs of Edom.20–30. Horite genealogies.31–39. The kings of Edom.40–43. The chiefs of Esau.CHS. XXXVII–L. JOSEPH AND HIS BRETHREN .Ch. XXXVII.—How Joseph was lost to his Father through his Brethren's Hatred and Treachery (P, JE).1–11. The alienation between Joseph and his brethren.12–17. Jacob sends Joseph to inquire after his brethren.18–30. The plot to murder Joseph frustrated by Reuben (E), or Judah (J).31–36. The deceiving of Jacob.Ch. XXXVIII.—Judah and Tamar (J).1–5. Judah founds a separate family at Adullam.6–11. Tamar's wrong.12–19. Tamar's daring stratagem.20–23. Judah fails to recover his pledge.24–26. The vindication of Tamar.27–30. Birth of Perez and Zerah.Ch. XXXIX.—Joseph is cast into Prison (J).1–6. Joseph becomes the controller of an Egyptian estate.7–20. Joseph tempted by his master's wife.21–23. Joseph in prison.Ch. XL.— Joseph proves his Gift of interpreting Dreams Joseph proves his Gift of interpreting Dreams (E).1–8. Pharaoh's officers in disgrace: their dreams.9–19. The dreams interpreted.20–23. The dreams fulfilled.Ch. XLI. Joseph becomes Viceroy of Egypt (JE, P).1–8. Pharaoh's dreams.9–14. Joseph summoned to interpret the dreams.15–24. Pharaoh's recital of his dreams.25–32. The interpretation.33–36. Joseph's advice to Pharaoh.37–46. Joseph's elevation.47–57.—Joseph's measures for relief of the famine.Ch. XLII.—Joseph's Brethren come to Egypt to buy Food (E, J)1–4. The journey to Egypt.5–17. The arrival in Egypt, and first interview with Joseph.18–26. The second interview.26–38. The return to Canaan.Chs. XLIII. XLIV.—The second Visit to Egypt (J).1–14. The journey resolved on.15–25. In Joseph's house.26–34. At Joseph's table.XLIV. 1–17. The cup in Benjamin's sack.18–34. Judah's plea for Benjamin.Ch. XLV.—Joseph reveals himself to his Brethren (E, J).1–8. The disclosure.9–15. Joseph's message to his father.16–20. Pharaoh's invitation.21–28. The brethren return to Canaan.XLVI. 1–XLVII. 12.—The Settlement of Jacob and his Family in Egypt (J, E, P). expresses only1–7. Jacob bids farewell to Canaan.8–27. A list of Jacob's immediate descendants.28–30. The meeting of Jacob and Joseph.XLVI. 31–XLVII. 12.— Joseph obtains Pharaoh's Joseph obtains Pharaoh's permission for his brethren to settle in Goshen.XLVII. 13–27.—Joseph's Agrarian Policy (J?).XLVII. 28–XLVIII. 22.—Jacob's last Interview with Joseph (J, E, P).28–31. Joseph promises to bury Jacob in Canaan.XLVIII. Adoption and blessing of Joseph's two sons.1, 2. The introduction3–6. P's brief account of the adoption of Ephraim and Manasseh.7. The presence of Joseph8, 9. E's narrative is resumed.10a, 13, 14 (J).15, 16. The Blessing (E).17–19. Continuing 14 (J).20. The clause21, 22. Closing words to Joseph (E).XLIX. 1–28a.—The Blessing of Jacob.1, 2. Introduction.3, 4. Reuben.5–7. Simeon and Levi.8–12. Judah.13–15. Zebulun and Issachar.16–21. Dan, Gad, Asher, and Naphtali.22–26. Joseph.27. Benjamin.XLIX. 28b–L. 26.—The Death and Burial of Jacob; and the Death of Joseph (P, J, E).28b–33. Jacob's charge to his sons.L. 1–14. The burial of Jacob.15–21. Joseph removes his brethren's fears.22–26. Joseph's old age and death.Extended NotesThe Divine Image in ManThe Hebrew and Babylonian SabbathBabylonian and other CosmogoniesThe Site of EdenThe ‘Protevangelium'.The CherubimOrigin and Significance of the Paradise LegendOrigin of the Cain LegendThe Cainite GenealogyThe Chronology of Ch. 5, etc.The Deluge Tradition.Noah's Curse and Blessing.The Babel LegendChronology of 11.10 ff.Historic Value of Ch. 14CircumcisionThe Covenant-Idea in PDestruction of the Cities of the PlainThe Sacrifice of IsaacThe Treaty of Gilead and its Historical SettingThe Legend of PenielThe Sack of ShechemThe Edomite GenealogiesThe Degradation of ReubenThe Fate of Simeon and LeviThe “Shiloh” Prophecy of 49.10The Zodiacal Theory of the Twelve TribesIndexI. EnglishII. Hebrew
international critical commentary genesis page https publishersrow ebookshuk books jewish hebrew ebooks electronic edition skinner work
eBookshuk Books

Tractate Bava Basra I: Commentary and Study Guide
The third of the three Talmudic tractates of the order Neziḳin, dealing with man's responsibilities and rights as the owner of property, of a house or field. The tractate is divided into ten chapters, the contents of which may be described as follows: (1) Regulations relating to property held by more than one owner (ch. i.); (2) responsibilities of an owner of property with regard to that of his neighbor (ch. ii.); (3) established rights of ownership and rights connected with property

Studies in Jewish Education XII: The Hebrew Language in the Era of Globalization
This volume of the Studies in Jewish Education examines the place of the Hebrew language today.

Jews in the Hungarian Economy 1760-1945
In the sixteen essays in this volume, scholars from three continents explore dispassionately various facets of the Jewish presence in the Hungarian economy over a span of two centuries. (Two of the articles deal with Vienna which had quite a sizeable contingent of Hungarian Jews.) The topics range from pure economic history dealing with entrepreneurship and occupational structure, to related fields such as demography, urbanization and nutrition. Several studies discuss the interaction of both

The Jews of Moslem Spain, Vol. 2/3
The second and third volume of a monumental survey of the Jewish community in Spain under Moslem rule. (See first volume here) It offers the reader access to a difficult subject. The period is recreated in a narrative that flows with life and vitality...unmatched for scholarship and readability.

Luah Hashanah 5777
A guide to prayers, readings, laws, and customs for the synagogue and for the home

Talmud: Mesekhet B'rakhot, in 4 volumes
A Study in the development of the Halakha and Haggadah in the Land of Israel and Babylonia.

Jesus
A compelling biography of Jesus of Nazareth, written by eminent Jewish scholar of the Second Temple and Early Christianity.

Ahad Ha-Am Asher Ginzberg: A Biography
Ahad Ha-Am's “spiritual Zionism” is still as capable, as it was fifty years ago, of giving inspiration and guidance to a large segment of the Jewry.

JPS Torah Commentary: Exodus
Masterly commentary on the second book of the Bible by eminent Jewish scholar.

Trujillo: A Jewish Community in Extremadura on the Eve of the Expulsion from Spain. Hispania Judaica, v. 2
Based on documents published for the first time, this book reveals the life and surroundings of a community lulled into a false sense of security and endeavouring to build its life in peace while the war against Granada continues.

Judaism and the Origins of Christianity
A massive collection of scholarship of the author who has pioneered new understanding of the Jewish background of early Christianity.

Hellenism
This book is intended for those interested in the conflict of Judaism with the culture of the ancient world and its impact on the Jewish life of today.

Legends of the Jews
A most remarkable and comprehensive compilation of stories connected to the Hebrew Bible drawn largely on Jewish lore and tradition. It is an indispensable reference on that body of literature known as Midrash, the imaginative retelling and elaboration on Bible stories in which mythological tales about demons and magic co-exist with moralistic stories about the piety of the patriarchs.

Luah Hashanah 5774
United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism's official calendar for the Jewish year. It is intended to guide congregations and individuals through the liturgy during the Jewish year 5774.

Studies in Jewish Education VIII: Teaching Classical Rabbinic Texts
THIS VOLUME FOCUSES ON THE PROBLEMS OF TEACHING CLASSICAL RABBINIC TEXTS.

THE EVOLUTION OF EXODUS TRADITION
A comprehensive literary inquiry into a history of the Exodus tradition as it has evolved through time. The book examines the narrative of Exodus, compares it to biblical sources as well as to information provided in Apocryphic, Pseudepigrahic, Hellenistic and Midrashic documents.

The Fifty-Third Chapter of Isaiah according to the Jewish interpreters (in 2 vols.)
Collection of printed texts and MSS. by Jewish commentators on the 53rd Chapter of Isaiah, brought together by AD. Nubauer and translated with assistance of S.R.Driver.

Tractate Rosh Hashana
For those who wish to go beyond superficial, Master A Mesikta Series is a perfect companion for the study of Talmud. The series provides important background information on Talmud and clarifies its content by focusing on controversies that give it such a power. Using outlines, elucidations, pointed comments, explanations of the sequence, topic overviews, and highlighting the interaction between aggadic portions and legal discussions, the author enables a student to rapidly master material

Mystic Tales from the Zohar
A translation of eight of the most interesting narratives found in the Zohar. In addition, the book contains a comprehensive introduction, a glossary, notes, and a bibliography.

Treatise Ta anit of the Babylonian Talmud: Critically Edited and Provided With A Translation and Notes
This book presents the first critical edition of the Talmudic text based on a minute collation of all the existing manuscripts and early editions of the Talmud itself, as well as of the Mishnah, Tosefta, the numerous halakic and haggadic Midrashim, the Yerushalmi, and the so-called Minor Tractates. The text is translated and elucidated for the benefit of a wider circle of readers, who are not in a position to study the original.

History of the Jews in Russia and Poland, Vol. 1: From the Beginning until the Death of Alexander I (1825)
A History of the Jews in Russia and Poland from the pen of S. M. Dubnow (based upon a work in Russian which was especially prepared for JPS) needs neither justification nor recommendation. The work is divided into thee volumes. The first volume contains the history of the Jews of Russia and Poland from its beginnings until 1825.

Legends of the Bible
This is storytelling with a grain of salt and a lot of wit; tales springing from the antiquity of oral tradition, told with sheer delight in the glory of a book transformed by a hundred generations whose daily thoughts and deeds were transformed by The Book.

Tosefta Ki-Fshutah, 12 vols.
The most important work of the 20th century giant of Talmudic scholarship.

ADULT EDUCATION IN CRISIS SITUATIONS


Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics Vol. 3
The most comprehensive work in its class; includes articles on all religions, ethical systems and movements, religious beliefs and customs, philosophical ideas, moral practices, as well as related subjects in anthropology, mythology, folklore, relevant areas of biology, psychology, economics and sociology.

Selected Religious Poems of Solomon Ibn Gabirol
Solomon Ibn Gabirol was not only a great poet, but also a great philosopher. His vision was broad and his penetration keen. This volume of translations from this rare singer of the Ghetto limits itself to such of his poems as have been incorporated in or designed for the liturgy of the Synagogue.

Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar, 2nd English Edition
Interactive edition of one of the most important Biblical Hebrew grammar ever published in English.

Life, Liberty and the Defense of Dignity: The Challenge for Bioethics
Thoughful, often profound writting about the limits of science and the limits of life, about what makes us human and gives us human dignity.

Studia Biblica et Ecclesiastica Vol. 4
asdf

Hellenism
This book is intended for those interested in the conflict of Judaism with the culture of the ancient world and its impact on the Jewish life of today.

Spain, the Jews, and Franco
The role played by Spain during World War II regarding the Jews has long been a matter of controversy. This volume, first published in Hebrew to wide acclaim seeks to set the record straight. It offers a full and objective account of the rescue of Jewish refugees from Nazi-occupied countries by the Franco regime.

Luah Hashannah 5778
A guide to prayers, readings, laws, and customs for the synagogue and for the home

History of the Jews in Russia and Poland, Vol. 3: From the Accession of Nicholas II until 1916. Bibliography and Index.
A History of the Jews in Russia and Poland from the pen of S. M. Dubnow (based upon a work in Russian which was especially prepared for JPS) needs neither justification nor recommendation. The work is divided into thee volumes. The third and concluding volume deals with the reign of Nicholas II., the last of the Romanovs, and also contains the bibliographical apparatus, the maps, the index, and other supplementary material.

The Jewish Encyclopedia Vol. 2
A monumental work which laid the foundation of Jewish scholarship in America. Written by more then 400 contributors from all over the world—many considered founding “fathers” of their respective disciplines—this massive 12-volume Encyclopedia remains unsurpassed in many areas. Each of its 12 volumes was re-created by craftsmen of Varda Graphics, Inc. to look as close to the original as possible, while allowing the reader to take advantage of the latest computer technology.

Smoke Over Birkenau
The astonishing stories in Smoke Over Birkenau tell of the women who lived and suffered alongside Liana Millu during her months in the concentration camp.

Introduction to the Talmud and Midrash
The classic work on the field. Not for beginners; for those interested in a more historical and critical study of Talmud and Midrash.

A History of the Jews in Christian Spain. Vol. 1
One of the century s great classics of Jewish historiography. This first volume of the two-volume set takes the story down to the middle of the thirteen century in Castile.

Come Under the Wings: A Midrash on Ruth
Grace Goldin makes the character of Ruth more vivid in her poetry. Two classical idioms, that of the Jewish imagination, and that of English verse, are strikingly joined in the book.

Aspects of the Jewish Economic History
A survey of the far-ranging Jewish contribution to economic progress of the Western world.

Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics Vol. 9
The most comprehensive work in its class; includes articles on all religions, ethical systems and movements, religious beliefs and customs, philosophical ideas, moral practices, as well as related subjects in anthropology, mythology, folklore, relevant areas of biology, psychology, economics and sociology.

Israel and the Nations
Israel and the Nations is a handbook of Jewish apologetics. The author's primary goal was to put together all the arguments of Jew-baiting and to explain their nature and origin. This work is a source of information and reference for all those who are in quest of enlightenment.

Hebrew: The Eternal Language
The extraordinary story of the Hebrew language is the subject of this book.

Jewish Life In The Middle Ages
A sweeping view of Jewish historical and cultural experience. Written in the end of the 19th century by an extremly astute historian and a storyteller, this volume will assist readers in better understanding the position of Jews in today's world as well.

Medieval Ketubot from Sefarad, Hispania Judaica v. 11
A careful examination of legal and historic aspects of 30 ketubots from various medieval Hispanic kingdoms; includes their comparison.

Selected Poems of Jehudah Halevi
The gift of song, cherished and tended as it was by the Spanish Jews of the Middle Ages, reached its highest development in the poems of Jehudah Halevi. His love poems are made of dew and fire. But in his poems to Zion there is no such combination of a poet's ordinary artifices. It is his soul that is the instrument—and on his heartstrings is played the song of Israel's hope.

Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics Vol. 1
The most comprehensive work in its class; includes articles on all religions, ethical systems and movements, religious beliefs and customs, philosophical ideas, moral practices, as well as related subjects in anthropology, mythology, folklore, relevant areas of biology, psychology, economics and sociology.

Hebrew: The Eternal Language
The extraordinary story of the Hebrew language is the subject of this book.

A Separate Republic
Based on the Libro Grande, which is included in this volume, this authoritative analysis of the Venetian Jewish community of the 17th century gives a snapshot of the political and social structure of the Jews of Venice as they related to the general population of the Venetian Republic of that period and to the ethnic,economic, and religious diversity within their own community.

The International Critical Commentary (ICC): PROVERBS
... the crown belongs to Crawford H. Toy's voluminous interpretation of the book of Proverbs --Rudolf Smend, from Wisdom in Ancient Israel , Cambridge, 1997.

Tales of Sendebar
Translated from original Hebrew version of the SEVEN SAGES, this collection of fascinating stories--based on unpublished manuscripts--makes available the complete English translation of Mishle Sendebar, the Hebrew version of an enormously popular medieval romance which originated in the East and was subsequently transmitted westward.