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118 William Cutter have

editor Walter Ackerman
118 William Cutter have promoted, and I have been free to pursue personal study in a way that unites my combined interest in education and literature. The School of Education has pursued a somewhat corporate path in its educational research, and I have chosen to follow the old and perhaps out- of- date university model of individual research as the occasion and desire strike me. The lack of discourse around individual research and theory concerns me, but it is clear that the voice of the Rhea Hirsch is firmer and more vigorous than it has ever been. The Age of the Grant: Wexner, Lilly and Covenant, Avihai, Cummings and The Council for Initiatives in Jewish Education There has been a major turn in organizational life in the United States, following the huge amounts of capital accumulation within certain American Jewish families. I believe foundations have emer-ged for three primary reasons and one factor that is often put into play: First is the lack of trust in existing institutions to plot the direction of our Jewish future. Second is the belief among wealthy people that their success at solving problems within their businesses can also be utilized to solve the problems of the American Jewish community. And, finally, family money permits individuals to enjoy the use of their freedom to do some good for the world. They may in the long run find the problems in Jewish life more intractable than their business problems. Business, as it grows, brings in income; public institutions, as they grow, cost money. Many of the founda-tions have done many wonderful things within American Jewish life, but too often the tail has wagged the dog. Only time will tell whether we have made a net gain as a consequence of grants for projects. And only maturity and restraint will guide school administrators to seek grants or to build up their permanent base through endowments and annual giving. The Rhea Hirsch School of the 1970s was greatly aided by The Institute for Jewish Life ( now defunct), and the National Endowment for the Humanities ( now struggling for its own survival). Some might speculate that the Hebrew Union College will exist long after many foundations run out of ideas, programs, and constituents. But whether or not that is true, it is clear that alumni of such a program will not be able to contribute major support for the programs sustenance, and most foundations cannot — by charter — Chapter Home  | TOC

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118 William Cutter have promoted, and I have been free to pursue personal study in a way that unites my combined interest in education and literature. The School of Education has pursued a somewhat corporate path in its educational research, and I have chosen to follow the old and perhaps out- of- date university model of individual research as the occasion and desire strike me. The lack of discourse around individual research and theory concerns me, but it is clear that the voice of the Rhea Hirsch is firmer and more vigorous than it has ever been. The Age of the Grant: Wexner, Lilly and Covenant, Avihai, Cummings and The Council for Initiatives in Jewish Education There has been a major turn in organizational life in the United States, following the huge amounts of capital accumulation within certain American Jewish families. I believe foundations have emer-ged for three primary reasons and one factor that is often put into play: First is the lack of trust in existing institutions to plot the direction of our Jewish future. Second is the belief among wealthy people that their success at solving problems within their businesses can also be utilized to solve the problems of the American Jewish community. And, finally, family money permits individuals to enjoy the use of their freedom to do some good for the world. They may in the long run find the problems in Jewish life more intractable than their business problems. Business, as it grows, brings in income; public institutions, as they grow, cost money. Many of the founda-tions have done many wonderful things within American Jewish life, but too often the tail has wagged the dog. Only time will tell whether we have made a net gain as a consequence of grants for projects. And only maturity and restraint will guide school administrators to seek grants or to build up their permanent base through endowments and annual giving. The Rhea Hirsch School of the 1970s was greatly aided by The Institute for Jewish Life ( now defunct), and the National Endowment for the Humanities ( now struggling for its own survival). Some might speculate that the Hebrew Union College will exist long after many foundations run out of ideas, programs, and constituents. But whether or not that is true, it is clear that alumni of such a program will not be able to contribute major support for the program's sustenance, and most foundations cannot — by charter — << Chapter >> Home | TOC
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