Varda Books



 View book pages:
 Buy this book:
  eBookshuk
  




230 On some newly- discovered

by S. R. Driver
230 On some newly- discovered Temanite Supplementary Notes. THE following are further particulars of the readings adopted by MM. Berger and Clermont- Ganneau, whose articles arrived too late to be alluded to ( pp. 209, 2 1 0 ) in the preceding essay except in the notes. P. 2 1 0 , Inscription 1, l. 3 , and p. 2 1 1 , Inscr. 4 , l l . 1 1 , 1 2 , 1 6 , 2 1 , I have accepted M. Clermont- Ganneaus ingenious interpretation of ùb) t as the name of a Deity ( see the Athenaeum, Feb. 2 8 , 1 8 8 5 ( No. 2 9 9 2 ) , p. 2 8 0 , where I have suggested that the word φ? ( Numbers xiv. 1 8 ) ,  their defence or shade, ought perhaps to be read ώϊ, and translate  Tselem is departed from them, and Jehovah is with us). Zalamu in Assyrian is the god of eclipse or darkness ( see Prof. Sayces Assyrian Grammar, p. 24). The word however, usually means in the Bible  image, and in this sense we find it also in a Sabaean or Himyaritic inscription ( see David probable from the statement of H e r o d o t u s 1 that  in his time the Arabs, i. e. the Nabataeans, were masters of the whole coast of Palestine. W e know, moreover, that the Assyrians trans-planted Aramaic- speaking races to Samaria and to Philistia. If, indeed, the Nabataeans were settled at Ashdod, the Ashdodith, the language of Ashdod, which the young g e n e - ration of the returned exiles spoke, according to Nehemiah, must have been the Nabataean l a n g u a g e 2 .  W i t h all this, it is easy to understand what a mixture of dialects must have prevailed in Palestine in the time of Ezra : Hebrew, N a b a - taean, Aramaic from Kutha and A v v a or Samaritan; to say nothing of the Babylonian dialect, which many who returned from exile must have brought with them. H o w far Ezra and Nehemiah succeeded in re- establishing Hebrew amongst the Jews, has been explained in a previous p a p e r 3 . 1 Herod. iii. 5. 2  See above, p. 42.  3 See above, pp. 40- 74. Chapter Home  | TOC t t t

Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  
230 On some newly- discovered Temanite Supplementary Notes. THE following are further particulars of the readings adopted by MM. Berger and Clermont- Ganneau, whose articles arrived too late to be alluded to ( pp. 209, 2 1 0 ) in the preceding essay except in the notes. P. 2 1 0 , Inscription 1, l. 3 , and p. 2 1 1 , Inscr. 4 , l l . 1 1 , 1 2 , 1 6 , 2 1 , I have accepted M. Clermont- Ganneau's ingenious interpretation of ùb) t as the name of a Deity ( see the Athenaeum, Feb. 2 8 , 1 8 8 5 ( No. 2 9 9 2 ) , p. 2 8 0 , where I have suggested that the word φ? ( Numbers xiv. 1 8 ) , ' their defence or shade,' ought perhaps to be read ώϊ, and translate ' Tselem is departed from them, and Jehovah is with us'). Zalamu in Assyrian is the god of eclipse or darkness ( see Prof. Sayce's Assyrian Grammar, p. 24). The word however, usually means in the Bible ' image,' and in this sense we find it also in a Sabaean or Himyaritic inscription ( see David probable from the statement of H e r o d o t u s 1 that in his time the Arabs, i. e. the Nabataeans, were masters of the whole coast of Palestine. W e know, moreover, that the Assyrians trans-planted Aramaic- speaking races to Samaria and to Philistia. If, indeed, the Nabataeans were settled at Ashdod, the Ashdodith, the language of Ashdod, which the young g e n e - ration of the returned exiles spoke, according to Nehemiah, must have been the Nabataean l a n g u a g e 2 . W i t h all this, it is easy to understand what a mixture of dialects must have prevailed in Palestine in the time of Ezra : Hebrew, N a b a - taean, Aramaic from Kutha and A v v a or Samaritan; to say nothing of the Babylonian dialect, which many who returned from exile must have brought with them. H o w far Ezra and Nehemiah succeeded in re- establishing Hebrew amongst the Jews, has been explained in a previous p a p e r 3 . 1 Herod. iii. 5. 2 See above, p. 42. 3 See above, pp. 40- 74. << Chapter >> Home | TOC t t t
Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  

Varda Books - 1-59045-980-6


 Other related titles:
Hebrew-English Tanakh: the Jewish BibleHebrew-English Tanakh: the Jewish Bible

 Already viewed books:
Studia Biblica et Ecclesiastica, in 5 volumesStudia Biblica et Ecclesiastica, in 5 volumes


TANAKH - INTERACTIVE HEBREW BIBLE