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CHAPTER IV BAPTISM WITHOUT

by S. R. Driver
CHAPTER IV BAPTISM WITHOUT A FONT Baptism in Apostolic times. BAPTISM in apostolic times was no doubt administered without any special font or building being set apart for the purpose. The 3,000 converts at Jerusalem ( Acts ii. 41), the jailor at Philippi ( xvi. 33), S. Paul at Damascus ( ix. 18), the disciples at Ephesus ( xix. 5), may have been baptized in some sort of bath, but it is difficult to imagine how the rite could have been carried out by submersion. The eunuch of queen Candace was baptized in the open air ( viii. 38), and the baptism of Lydia and her household ( xvi. 15) may have taken place in the river near the place of prayer where she met S. Paul. Tertullian declares ( De Bapt. 4) that S. Peter baptized in the Tiber, and he evidently contemplated the possibility of open- air baptism in his own day ( c. 200). Ideoque nulla distinctio est, mari quis an stagno flumine an fonte, lacu an alveo diluatur; nec quicquam refert inter eos, quos Ioannes in Iordane et quos Petrus in Tiberi tinxit, nisi et ille spado, quem Philippus inter vias fortuita aqua tinxit, plus salutis aut minus retulit. The place of Christs baptism. The custom of open- air baptizing in the Jordan district continued at least as late as the fifth century. We have seen how such a scene of open- air baptism was interpreted in art, in the representations of our Lords baptism. The natural features of the Holy Land, as well as local tradition, still further support this interpretation as being correct in the point we are considering, viz. the depth of the water. Z 2 Chapter Home  | TOC  | Index

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CHAPTER IV BAPTISM WITHOUT A FONT Baptism in Apostolic times. BAPTISM in apostolic times was no doubt administered without any special font or building being set apart for the purpose. The 3,000 converts at Jerusalem ( Acts ii. 41), the jailor at Philippi ( xvi. 33), S. Paul at Damascus ( ix. 18), the disciples at Ephesus ( xix. 5), may have been baptized in some sort of bath, but it is difficult to imagine how the rite could have been carried out by submersion. The eunuch of queen Candace was baptized in the open air ( viii. 38), and the baptism of Lydia and her household ( xvi. 15) may have taken place in the river near the place of prayer where she met S. Paul. Tertullian declares ( De Bapt. 4) that S. Peter baptized in the Tiber, and he evidently contemplated the possibility of open- air baptism in his own day ( c. 200). Ideoque nulla distinctio est, mari quis an stagno flumine an fonte, lacu an alveo diluatur; nec quicquam refert inter eos, quos Ioannes in Iordane et quos Petrus in Tiberi tinxit, nisi et ille spado, quem Philippus inter vias fortuita aqua tinxit, plus salutis aut minus retulit. The place of Christ's baptism. The custom of open- air baptizing in the Jordan district continued at least as late as the fifth century. We have seen how such a scene of open- air baptism was interpreted in art, in the representations of our Lord's baptism. The natural features of the Holy Land, as well as local tradition, still further support this interpretation as being correct in the point we are considering, viz. the depth of the water. Z 2 << Chapter >> Home | TOC | Index
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