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68 Studia Biblica et

by S. R. Driver
68 Studia Biblica et Ecclesiastica. earlier narrative belonged to the reign of Wakhthang, and was therefore not later than 483 A. D. To this earlier nucleus of Djouanshers work belongs the episode of the conversion of Iberia by St. Nouna, which I now translate; and we are probably entitled to assume that the Armenian represents a form of the text as it was written down before the end of the fifth century. The general impression left on ones mind, after confronting the Armenian document with the Georgian as translated by Miss Wardrop, is, that the latter has been handed down with great fidelity. In this connexion it is well to draw the readers attention to the following points. 1. The marginal numbers inset of my translation of the Armenian show at a glance the correspondence page by page of Djouanshers narrative with Miss Wardrops translation. A glance at them shows that Djouanshers narrative was shorter in form and more compact than the existing Georgian text. And this remains certain, even if we admit, as we must, that the Armenian translator considerably abridged his original. 2. The structure of the original document is best preserved in the Armenian. Thus its opening words make it clear, that, when Nino had been three years only in Mtzkhetha, she communicated to Salome the narrative of her previous life, pp. 1- 23. At the close of this narrative the right transition to Abiathars narrative is provided by the Armenian alone in Ninos closing words:— And if thou ask thou shalt learn from Abiathar the truth. Abiathar at once begins his story. It continues as far as p. 29,  by the bridge of the Magi. Here the Armenian quite rightly puts the episode of the Jews desiring to stone Abiathar at the conclusion of his story, which he may have repeated to Salome in the Jewish quarter of Mtzkhetha. But the Georgian text is dislocated at this point, and defers this episode to p. 31, interpolating it in the middle of the continued narrative of Ninos missionary activity. That narrative, which rightly speaks of Nino in the third person, continues as far as p. 54, that is, up to the saints death- bed scene. And here the Armenian, more clearly than Chapter Home  | TOC  | Index

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68 Studia Biblica et Ecclesiastica. earlier narrative belonged to the reign of Wakhthang, and was therefore not later than 483 A. D. To this earlier nucleus of Djouansher's work belongs the episode of the conversion of Iberia by St. Nouna, which I now translate; and we are probably entitled to assume that the Armenian represents a form of the text as it was written down before the end of the fifth century. The general impression left on one's mind, after confronting the Armenian document with the Georgian as translated by Miss Wardrop, is, that the latter has been handed down with great fidelity. In this connexion it is well to draw the readers attention to the following points. 1. The marginal numbers inset of my translation of the Armenian show at a glance the correspondence page by page of Djouansher's narrative with Miss Wardrop's translation. A glance at them shows that Djouansher's narrative was shorter in form and more compact than the existing Georgian text. And this remains certain, even if we admit, as we must, that the Armenian translator considerably abridged his original. 2. The structure of the original document is best preserved in the Armenian. Thus its opening words make it clear, that, when Nino had been three years only in Mtzkhet'ha, she communicated to Salome the narrative of her previous life, pp. 1- 23. At the close of this narrative the right transition to Abiathar's narrative is provided by the Armenian alone in Nino's closing words:—' And if thou ask thou shalt learn from Abiathar the truth.' Abiathar at once begins his story. It continues as far as p. 29, ' by the bridge of the Magi.' Here the Armenian quite rightly puts the episode of the Jews desiring to stone Abiathar at the conclusion of his story, which he may have repeated to Salome in the Jewish quarter of Mtzkhet'ha. But the Georgian text is dislocated at this point, and defers this episode to p. 31, interpolating it in the middle of the continued narrative of Nino's missionary activity. That narrative, which rightly speaks of Nino in the third person, continues as far as p. 54, that is, up to the saint's death- bed scene. And here the Armenian, more clearly than << Chapter >> Home | TOC | Index
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