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[ 67] THE ARMENIAN VERSION

by S. R. Driver
[ 67] THE ARMENIAN VERSION OF DJOUANSHER TRANSLATED BY F. C. CONYBEARE. PREFATORY NOTE. IN Armenian is preserved a history of the Georgians ascribed to one Djouansher. That it is a translation of a Georgian writers work, the occurrence in it of Georgian forms and idioms proves, and it was made not later than the thirteenth century, for it is quoted in the history of Stephanos Ourbelian, who lived in the time of Gregory Anavarzi towards the end of that century. In chapter xvi ( p. 104 of the San Lazaro edition of 1884) this work contains a notice which reveals to us the Georgian sources used. The following is the passage:  And this brief history was found in the time of confusion, and was placed in the book which is called The Kharthlis ( or Qarthlis) Tzkkorepa1, that is, The History of the Karthli. And Djouansher found it, written up to the time of King Wakhthang. And Djouansher himself continued it up to the present time, and entrusted the ( record) of events to those who saw and fell in with him ( or them) in his time. In spite of the obscurity of the last sentence, it is clear from the above that the Armenian is a translation of Djouansher; and as the notice follows immediately after the narrative of the martyrdom of King Artchil II, who reigned from 688- 718, the Georgian original was a document of considerable antiquity. Within that original, however, was included a narrative of still earlier date which Djouansher merely continued up to his own day. The redaction of this 1 See Miss Wardrops preface, p. 4. F 2, Chapter Home  | TOC  | Index t

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[ 67] THE ARMENIAN VERSION OF DJOUANSHER TRANSLATED BY F. C. CONYBEARE. PREFATORY NOTE. IN Armenian is preserved a history of the Georgians ascribed to one Djouansher. That it is a translation of a Georgian writers work, the occurrence in it of Georgian forms and idioms proves, and it was made not later than the thirteenth century, for it is quoted in the history of Stephanos Ourbelian, who lived in the time of Gregory Anavarzi towards the end of that century. In chapter xvi ( p. 104 of the San Lazaro edition of 1884) this work contains a notice which reveals to us the Georgian sources used. The following is the passage: ' And this brief history was found in the time of confusion, and was placed in the book which is called The Kharthlis ( or Qarthlis) Tzkkorepa1, that is, The History of the Karthli. And Djouansher found it, written up to the time of King Wakhthang. And Djouansher himself continued it up to the present time, and entrusted the ( record) of events to those who saw and fell in with him ( or them) in his time.' In spite of the obscurity of the last sentence, it is clear from the above that the Armenian is a translation of Djouansher; and as the notice follows immediately after the narrative of the martyrdom of King Artchil II, who reigned from 688- 718, the Georgian original was a document of considerable antiquity. Within that original, however, was included a narrative of still earlier date which Djouansher merely continued up to his own day. The redaction of this 1 See Miss Wardrop's preface, p. 4. F 2, << Chapter >> Home | TOC | Index t
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