Varda Books



 View book pages:
 Buy this book:
  eBookshuk
  




COMMUNAL RESPONSES TO

editor Janet Aviad
COMMUNAL RESPONSES TO TEACHER SHORTAGE 41 I do not know of a single school that closed its doors and ceased to exist during the so- called  crisis.  The heart of American Jewry continued its normal beat, and there was no serious disruption of Jewish education activity in the past 14 years [ since the 1956AAJE  Conference on The Manpower Crisis in Jewish Educa-tion]. 3 2 Since the American Jewish community has shown itself capable of mobilization and action for other  crises the question stands: why so little action in the face of this acknowledged problem? The Historical Context We can now turn to the formative period in American Jewish history, the years between 1880 and 1924, when the existing Jew-ish community, of predominantly German origin, was shaken and challenged by the arrival of more than four million immigrants from Eastern Europe. Since it is known that events and ideas dur-ing times of crisis and change are mythologized, it is not surprising that relevant myths can be traced to this period, one of fundamen-tal transformation and redefinition. From the history which is but summarized below, we can extrapolate two myths which are of significance to our problem: ( 1) the myth that the synagogue and communal worlds are separate and ( 2) the myth that Jewish educa-tion is a threat to the full participation of Jews in American life. The configuration of the organized Jewish community was set by the early decades of this century. The Jewish population of the United States swelled from 250, 000 in 1880 to 1, 110, 000 in 1900 and 4, 500, 000 in 1925. Emphasizing the magnitude of this popula-tion shift, Arthur Goren noted: In 1880 perhaps one sixth of the 250, 000 American Jews were immigrants from Eastern Europe. Forty years later they and their children constituted about five sixths of the four million Jews in the United States. One third of Eastern European Jewry left their homes during those decades, and over ninety percent of them came to the United States. This largest of Jewish pop- 32 David I. Bloom,  Towards a Solution of Our Problem,  Jewish Educa-tion in the 70 s: Educators Assembly 1970 Yearbook,  ed. Eli Grad ( New York: United Synagogues of America, 1970), 91. Chapter Home  | TOC t

Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>  | Contents             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  
COMMUNAL RESPONSES TO TEACHER SHORTAGE 41 I do not know of a single school that closed its doors and ceased to exist during the so- called ' crisis. ' The heart of American Jewry continued its normal beat, and there was no serious disruption of Jewish education activity in the past 14 years [ since the 1956 AAJE Conference on The Manpower Crisis in Jewish Educa-tion]. 3 2 Since the American Jewish community has shown itself capable of mobilization and action for other \\" crises\\" the question stands: why so little action in the face of this acknowledged problem? The Historical Context We can now turn to the formative period in American Jewish history, the years between 1880 and 1924, when the existing Jew-ish community, of predominantly German origin, was shaken and challenged by the arrival of more than four million immigrants from Eastern Europe. Since it is known that events and ideas dur-ing times of crisis and change are mythologized, it is not surprising that relevant myths can be traced to this period, one of fundamen-tal transformation and redefinition. From the history which is but summarized below, we can extrapolate two myths which are of significance to our problem: ( 1) the myth that the synagogue and communal worlds are separate and ( 2) the myth that Jewish educa-tion is a threat to the full participation of Jews in American life. The configuration of the organized Jewish community was set by the early decades of this century. The Jewish population of the United States swelled from 250, 000 in 1880 to 1, 110, 000 in 1900 and 4, 500, 000 in 1925. Emphasizing the magnitude of this popula-tion shift, Arthur Goren noted: In 1880 perhaps one sixth of the 250, 000 American Jews were immigrants from Eastern Europe. Forty years later they and their children constituted about five sixths of the four million Jews in the United States. One third of Eastern European Jewry left their homes during those decades, and over ninety percent of them came to the United States. This largest of Jewish pop- 32 David I. Bloom, \\" Towards a Solution of Our Problem, \\" Jewish Educa-tion in the 70' s: Educators Assembly 1970 Yearbook, ed. Eli Grad ( New York: United Synagogues of America, 1970), 91. << Chapter >> Home | TOC t
Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>  | Contents             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  

Varda Books - 1-59045-964-4


 Already viewed books:
STUDIES IN JEWISH EDUCATION III: Teacher, Teaching, and CommunitySTUDIES IN JEWISH EDUCATION III: Teacher, Teaching, and Community


TANAKH - INTERACTIVE HEBREW BIBLE