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by S. R. Driver
C h a p t e r Home  | T O C  | I n d e x A PPE N DI X The Inscription of Mesha‛, commonly known as the ‘ Moabite Stone.’ The Inscription of Mesha‛ ( which has been several times referred to in the preceding pages) is of such importance as an authentic and original monument of the ninth century b. c., remarkably illustrating the Old Testament, that I have inserted here a transcription and translation of it, accompanied by a brief commentary. I have con-fined myself to the minimum of necessary explanation, and have purposely avoided entering upon a discussion of controverted readings or interpretations. The doubtful passages are, fortunately, few in number, being limited chiefly to certain letters at the extreme left of some of the lines, and to two or three Fπαξ @ hρημNνα, and do not interfere with the interpretation of the Inscription as a whole. Palaeographical details must be learnt from the monograph of Smend and Socin, referred to on p. iv, and from Clermont- Ganneau’s ‘ Examen Critique du Texte,’ in the Journ. As., Janv. 1887, pp. 72– 112 1. The deviations from the text of Smend and Socin, adopted in the first edition of the present work, were introduced partly on the authority of Clermont- Ganneau, partly on that of E. Renan in the Journal des Savans, 1887, pp. 158– 164, and of Th. Nöldeke in the Lit. Centralblatt, Jan. 8, 1887, coll. 59– 61: in the present edition, a few changes in the uncertain places have been made in consequence of the re- examination of the stone and squeeze by Nordlander ( Die Inschrift des Königs Mesa von Moab, 1896), and Lidzbarski, Ephemeris, i ( 1902), p. 1 ff. 2 Of the older literature connected with the Inscription, the most important is the monograph of Nöldeke, Die Inschrift des Königs Mesa von Moab ( Kiel, 1870), to which in parts of my explanatory notes I am indebted. It ought 1 See also the Revue Critique, 1875, No. 37, pp. 166– 174 ( by the same writer). 2 See also the transcription, with notes, in his Altsemitische Texte, Heft i ( 1907), p. 1 ff.

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< < C h a p t e r >> Home | T O C | I n d e x A PPE N DI X The Inscription of Mesha‛, commonly known as the ‘ Moabite Stone.’ The Inscription of Mesha‛ ( which has been several times referred to in the preceding pages) is of such importance as an authentic and original monument of the ninth century b. c., remarkably illustrating the Old Testament, that I have inserted here a transcription and translation of it, accompanied by a brief commentary. I have con-fined myself to the minimum of necessary explanation, and have purposely avoided entering upon a discussion of controverted readings or interpretations. The doubtful passages are, fortunately, few in number, being limited chiefly to certain letters at the extreme left of some of the lines, and to two or three Fπαξ @ hρημNνα, and do not interfere with the interpretation of the Inscription as a whole. Palaeographical details must be learnt from the monograph of Smend and Socin, referred to on p. iv, and from Clermont- Ganneau’s ‘ Examen Critique du Texte,’ in the Journ. As., Janv. 1887, pp. 72– 112 1. The deviations from the text of Smend and Socin, adopted in the first edition of the present work, were introduced partly on the authority of Clermont- Ganneau, partly on that of E. Renan in the Journal des Savans, 1887, pp. 158– 164, and of Th. Nöldeke in the Lit. Centralblatt, Jan. 8, 1887, coll. 59– 61: in the present edition, a few changes in the uncertain places have been made in consequence of the re- examination of the stone and squeeze by Nordlander ( Die Inschrift des Königs Mesa von Moab, 1896), and Lidzbarski, Ephemeris, i ( 1902), p. 1 ff. 2 Of the older literature connected with the Inscription, the most important is the monograph of Nöldeke, Die Inschrift des Königs Mesa von Moab ( Kiel, 1870), to which in parts of my explanatory notes I am indebted. It ought 1 See also the Revue Critique, 1875, No. 37, pp. 166– 174 ( by the same writer). 2 See also the transcription, with notes, in his Altsemitische Texte, Heft i ( 1907), p. 1 ff.
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