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CHAPTER SEVEN Postscript:

by Michael Brown
CHAPTER SEVEN Postscript: « Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose? » “ A Minor Land of Promise” Whatever obstacles they encountered on the path to integration dur-ing the period under review, Canadian Jews and others still felt— and not without reason— that Jews were better accepted in Canada than in most other countries of the world. They certainly were beginning to feel at home in Anglo- Canada. It must be remembered, after all, that Jews of the nineteenth and early twentieth century lived with vivid personal memories of Russian and Romanian poverty and per-secution. As a result, they tended to downplay the relatively mild and polite discrimination they met in Anglo- Canada and in other Eng-lish- speaking countries, perhaps even to expect it as a fact of Jewish life. On the other hand, French- Canadian antisemitism— because it evoked memories of continental Europe, because it sometimes called for the total exclusion of Jews from Canada, because it was often not polite, although it was usually not violent— appeared menacing and unacceptable. To a significant degree in the period before World War I, Jews en-tered into the life of Anglo- Canada, following, for the most part, the occupational patterns and life styles of Anglo- Canadians. They learned   C h a p t e r Home  | T O C  | I n d e x For use on stand- alone, non- institutional computers only. To purchase Scholar PDF version with advanced functionality, go to www. publishersrow. com

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CHAPTER SEVEN Postscript: « Plus ça change, plus c’est la même chose? » “ A Minor Land of Promise” Whatever obstacles they encountered on the path to integration dur-ing the period under review, Canadian Jews and others still felt— and not without reason— that Jews were better accepted in Canada than in most other countries of the world. They certainly were beginning to feel at home in Anglo- Canada. It must be remembered, after all, that Jews of the nineteenth and early twentieth century lived with vivid personal memories of Russian and Romanian poverty and per-secution. As a result, they tended to downplay the relatively mild and polite discrimination they met in Anglo- Canada and in other Eng-lish- speaking countries, perhaps even to expect it as a fact of Jewish life. On the other hand, French- Canadian antisemitism— because it evoked memories of continental Europe, because it sometimes called for the total exclusion of Jews from Canada, because it was often not polite, although it was usually not violent— appeared menacing and unacceptable. To a significant degree in the period before World War I, Jews en-tered into the life of Anglo- Canada, following, for the most part, the occupational patterns and life styles of Anglo- Canadians. They learned < < C h a p t e r >> Home | T O C | I n d e x For use on stand- alone, non- institutional computers only. To purchase Scholar PDF version with advanced functionality, go to www. publishersrow. com
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