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250 Jew or Juif? One

by Michael Brown
250 Jew or Juif? One way in which certain Canadian Jews sought status is sympto-matic of their situation. The list of those who became foreign consuls is not short. The Jews who represented Francophone Europe in Canada have already been mentioned. Other countries were represented by Jews in these years, as well: David A. Ansell was Mexican consul in Mon-treal; A. Boronow served as Danish consul there and was succeeded by another Jew, Herman A. Wolff; Maxwell Goldstein served for a time as consul in Montreal for both Germany and Austria- Hungary. Consul-ships were generally unpaid or minimally paid positions, but the post conferred status on its holder. Ironically, then, one of the few ways for a Jew to acquire high standing in the general community during these years was by becoming an officer of a foreign power. Yet, although these offices imparted status to individual Jews, as noted earlier, they rein-forced the sense of Jews as foreigners,  an image further strengthened by Jews’ adherence to Zionism. 133 The relative insecurity of Canadian Jews and the ambiguousness of their status help explain the relatively small scale of Jewish immigra-tion to the Dominion. Naturally far fewer Jews immigrated to Canada than to the United States during the period under review ( perhaps sev-enty- five thousand as compared with about three million). Canada it-self had a much smaller population than its southern neighbor; and its economic absorptive capacity was more limited. But even proportion-ately, far fewer Jews entered Canada than the United States. In 1914 Jews represented close to 3 percent of the American population; in Can-ada they accounted for about 1 percent. There were as many Jews in the greater Boston area in 1914 as there were in all of Canada. Official immigration policy, the harsh climate, limited economic opportunities, among other factors, influenced the number of Jewish immigrants. It is likely, however, that Jews’ awareness of Canadian ambivalence regard-ing them weighed even more heavily. Given the opportunity for full equality in the United States and to a somewhat lesser degree in Eng-land, Jews understandably exhibited some reluctance to become a third solitude in Canada.   C h a p t e r Home  | T O C  | I n d e x For use on stand- alone, non- institutional computers only. To purchase Scholar PDF version with advanced functionality, go to www. publishersrow. com

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250 Jew or Juif? One way in which certain Canadian Jews sought status is sympto-matic of their situation. The list of those who became foreign consuls is not short. The Jews who represented Francophone Europe in Canada have already been mentioned. Other countries were represented by Jews in these years, as well: David A. Ansell was Mexican consul in Mon-treal; A. Boronow served as Danish consul there and was succeeded by another Jew, Herman A. Wolff; Maxwell Goldstein served for a time as consul in Montreal for both Germany and Austria- Hungary. Consul-ships were generally unpaid or minimally paid positions, but the post conferred status on its holder. Ironically, then, one of the few ways for a Jew to acquire high standing in the general community during these years was by becoming an officer of a foreign power. Yet, although these offices imparted status to individual Jews, as noted earlier, they rein-forced the sense of Jews as foreigners, an image further strengthened by Jews’ adherence to Zionism. 133 The relative insecurity of Canadian Jews and the ambiguousness of their status help explain the relatively small scale of Jewish immigra-tion to the Dominion. Naturally far fewer Jews immigrated to Canada than to the United States during the period under review ( perhaps sev-enty- five thousand as compared with about three million). Canada it-self had a much smaller population than its southern neighbor; and its economic absorptive capacity was more limited. But even proportion-ately, far fewer Jews entered Canada than the United States. In 1914 Jews represented close to 3 percent of the American population; in Can-ada they accounted for about 1 percent. There were as many Jews in the greater Boston area in 1914 as there were in all of Canada. Official immigration policy, the harsh climate, limited economic opportunities, among other factors, influenced the number of Jewish immigrants. It is likely, however, that Jews’ awareness of Canadian ambivalence regard-ing them weighed even more heavily. Given the opportunity for full equality in the United States and to a somewhat lesser degree in Eng-land, Jews understandably exhibited some reluctance to become a third solitude in Canada. < < C h a p t e r >> Home | T O C | I n d e x For use on stand- alone, non- institutional computers only. To purchase Scholar PDF version with advanced functionality, go to www. publishersrow. com
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