Varda Books



 View book pages:
 Buy this book:
  eBookshuk
  




be missed, in which case

by JPS / Varda Books
be missed, in which case the traditional translation was given in the name of Others ( usually referring to the Society’s version of 1917); ( 4) where the understanding of a passage could be facilitated by reference to another passage elsewhere in the Bible; and ( 5) where important textual variants are to be found in some of the ancient manuscripts or versions of the Bible. The translators avoided obsolete words and phrases and, whenever possible, rendered Hebrew idioms by means of their normal English equivalents. For the second person singular, the modern you was used instead of the archaic thou, even when referring to the Deity (You). A further obvious difference between this translation and most of the older ones is in the rendering of the Hebrew particle waw, which is usually translated and. Biblical Hebrew demanded the frequent use of the waw, but in that style it had the force not only of and but also of however,  but, yet, when, and any number of other such words and particles, or none at all that can be translated into English. Always to render it as and is to misrepresent the Hebrew rather than be faithful to it. Consequently, the committee translated the particle as the sense required, or left it untranslated. The chapter and verse divisions found in the printed Bible are indispensable as a system of precise reference, but they do not always coincide with the organic divisions of the text. The chapter divisions, whose origin is neither ancient nor Jewish but medieval Christian, sometimes join or separate the wrong paragraphs, sentences, or even parts of sentences. The verse divisions, though considerably older and of Jewish origin, sometimes join together parts of different sentences or separate from each other parts of the same sentence. The translation of Saadia Gaon often does not correspond to our chapter divisions, which did not exist in his day. More noteworthy is the readiness with which he joined separate verses of the Hebrew text (whose authority he did not question) into single sentences when the sense required it. Thus, in joining Genesis 7.24 and 8.1 into a single sentence, or combining the last part of 1 Kings 6.38 with 7.1, the present translation is following the example of Saadia. The attentive reader will discover other instances in which the translators have followed what they considered to be the logical units of meaning even when they did not coincide with the conventional chapters and verses. The latter, however, are marked and numbered throughout. The preface to the first edition of The Torah was dated September 25, 1962, Erev Rosh Ha-Shanah 5723. A second edition, incorporating some changes by the translators, came out five years later. The committee also produced translations of The Five Megilloth and Jonah ( 1969), Isaiah xxiv

Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>  | Contents             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  
be missed, in which case the traditional translation was given in the name of \\"Others\\" ( usually referring to the Society’s version of 1917); ( 4) where the understanding of a passage could be facilitated by reference to another passage elsewhere in the Bible; and ( 5) where important textual variants are to be found in some of the ancient manuscripts or versions of the Bible. The translators avoided obsolete words and phrases and, whenever possible, rendered Hebrew idioms by means of their normal English equivalents. For the second person singular, the modern \\"you\\" was used instead of the archaic \\"thou,\\" even when referring to the Deity (\\"You\\"). A further obvious difference between this translation and most of the older ones is in the rendering of the Hebrew particle waw, which is usually translated \\"and.\\" Biblical Hebrew demanded the frequent use of the waw, but in that style it had the force not only of \\"and\\" but also of \\"however,\\" \\" but,\\" \\"yet,\\" \\"when,\\" and any number of other such words and particles, or none at all that can be translated into English. Always to render it as \\"and\\" is to misrepresent the Hebrew rather than be faithful to it. Consequently, the committee translated the particle as the sense required, or left it untranslated. The chapter and verse divisions found in the printed Bible are indispensable as a system of precise reference, but they do not always coincide with the organic divisions of the text. The chapter divisions, whose origin is neither ancient nor Jewish but medieval Christian, sometimes join or separate the wrong paragraphs, sentences, or even parts of sentences. The verse divisions, though considerably older and of Jewish origin, sometimes join together parts of different sentences or separate from each other parts of the same sentence. The translation of Saadia Gaon often does not correspond to our chapter divisions, which did not exist in his day. More noteworthy is the readiness with which he joined separate verses of the Hebrew text (whose authority he did not question) into single sentences when the sense required it. Thus, in joining Genesis 7.24 and 8.1 into a single sentence, or combining the last part of 1 Kings 6.38 with 7.1, the present translation is following the example of Saadia. The attentive reader will discover other instances in which the translators have followed what they considered to be the logical units of meaning even when they did not coincide with the conventional chapters and verses. The latter, however, are marked and numbered throughout. The preface to the first edition of The Torah was dated September 25, 1962, Erev Rosh Ha-Shanah 5723. A second edition, incorporating some changes by the translators, came out five years later. The committee also produced translations of The Five Megilloth and Jonah ( 1969), Isaiah xxiv
Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>  | Contents             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  

Varda Books - 1-59045-077-9


 Other related titles:
JPS Bible Commentary: EstherJPS Bible Commentary: Esther
JPS Bible Commentary: HaftarotJPS Bible Commentary: Haftarot
JPS Bible Commentary: JonahJPS Bible Commentary: Jonah
JPS Torah Commentary: DeuteronomyJPS Torah Commentary: Deuteronomy
JPS Torah Commentary: ExodusJPS Torah Commentary: Exodus
JPS Torah Commentary: GenesisJPS Torah Commentary: Genesis
JPS Torah Commentary: LeviticusJPS Torah Commentary: Leviticus
JPS Torah Commentary: NumbersJPS Torah Commentary: Numbers
The Torah: The Five Books of MosesThe Torah: The Five Books of Moses

 Already viewed books:
JPS Hebrew-English (Jewish Bible) TanakhJPS Hebrew-English (Jewish Bible) Tanakh


TANAKH - INTERACTIVE HEBREW BIBLE