Varda Books



 View book pages:
 Buy this book:
  eBookshuk
  




of twenty-nine words.

by JPS / Varda Books
of twenty-nine words. Coincidentally, twenty-eight of them now match the received and Yemenite texts. In Prophets and Writings—historically, regulated less precisely than Torah—we printed the codex text regardless of marginal notes. For those two sections, our codex’s spelling is already closer to masoretic tradition than that of the received editions (as exemplified by Letteris and Koren). Hymns. Song of the Sea (Exodus 15) and Song of Deborah (Judges 5) are national anthems. We reproduced ancient graphic designs that adorn their lyrics, following the traditionally recommended practice of setting written gaps at syntactic pauses. Another hymn, the Song of Moses (Deuteronomy 32), we treated differently in accord with its lesser distinctiveness in later tradition. In all three cases we enabled the reader to correlate text with translation. Lists. Our codex displayed many sections in a traditional list format, which we employed only in the cases required by masorah and halakhah: the conquered kings (Joshua 12) and Haman’s sons (Esther 9). Weekly Torah Portions. We divided the Torah into parashiyot—the weekly portions within an annual public reading cycle according to Babylonian Jewish tradition—because contemporary Torah study often refers to them. We did not show the older division into smaller sections (sedarim) per Levantine Jewish tradition, no longer in common use. Reading Tradition Versus Writing Tradition. Previous editions set the qere consonants in the margin, which has proven awkward in use; pronouncing the qere has required simultaneously looking for consonants in the margin while looking for vowels in the text. In contrast, our side-by-side, in-the-text format preserves the distinctness of the two forms while making it easy to read the qere. This edition contains 1,322 kethib/qere instances located as per MCW (see above, page xii note 5 and page xiii), with two cases added for clarity: the form of na‘ ara(h) in Genesis (for which we adopted the masoretic practice in Deuteronomy), and Numbers 10: 36. Letter Size. Masoretic tradition was not consistent about writing certain letters larger or smaller than normal. The meaning of letter size is only occasionally clear. Later manuscripts (and modern printed editions) tend to have more odd-sized letters than earlier ones. In Torah we set odd-sized letters according to modern practice, noting our sources. In Prophets and Writings, we went according to our codex text. Nequdot (Extraordinary Points). Traditionally, a point that marks uncertainty is placed atop and/or below certain letters. The number and placement of these obscure markers varies among the sources. In Torah, we placed these points at ten locations according to the modern editions. xvii

Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>  | Contents             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  
of twenty-nine words. Coincidentally, twenty-eight of them now match the \\"received\\" and Yemenite texts. In Prophets and Writings—historically, regulated less precisely than Torah—we printed the codex text regardless of marginal notes. For those two sections, our codex’s spelling is already closer to masoretic tradition than that of the \\"received\\" editions (as exemplified by Letteris and Koren). Hymns. Song of the Sea (Exodus 15) and Song of Deborah (Judges 5) are national anthems. We reproduced ancient graphic designs that adorn their lyrics, following the traditionally recommended practice of setting written gaps at syntactic pauses. Another hymn, the Song of Moses (Deuteronomy 32), we treated differently in accord with its lesser distinctiveness in later tradition. In all three cases we enabled the reader to correlate text with translation. Lists. Our codex displayed many sections in a traditional list format, which we employed only in the cases required by masorah and halakhah: the conquered kings (Joshua 12) and Haman’s sons (Esther 9). Weekly Torah Portions. We divided the Torah into parashiyot—the weekly portions within an annual public reading cycle according to Babylonian Jewish tradition—because contemporary Torah study often refers to them. We did not show the older division into smaller sections (sedarim) per Levantine Jewish tradition, no longer in common use. Reading Tradition Versus Writing Tradition. Previous editions set the qere consonants in the margin, which has proven awkward in use; pronouncing the qere has required simultaneously looking for consonants in the margin while looking for vowels in the text. In contrast, our side-by-side, in-the-text format preserves the distinctness of the two forms while making it easy to read the qere. This edition contains 1,322 kethib/qere instances located as per MCW (see above, page xii note 5 and page xiii), with two cases added for clarity: the form of na‘ ara(h) in Genesis (for which we adopted the masoretic practice in Deuteronomy), and Numbers 10: 36. Letter Size. Masoretic tradition was not consistent about writing certain letters larger or smaller than normal. The meaning of letter size is only occasionally clear. Later manuscripts (and modern printed editions) tend to have more odd-sized letters than earlier ones. In Torah we set odd-sized letters according to modern practice, noting our sources. In Prophets and Writings, we went according to our codex text. Nequdot (Extraordinary Points). Traditionally, a point that marks uncertainty is placed atop and/or below certain letters. The number and placement of these obscure markers varies among the sources. In Torah, we placed these points at ten locations according to the modern editions. xvii
Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>  | Contents             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  

Varda Books - 1-59045-077-9


 Other related titles:
JPS Bible Commentary: EstherJPS Bible Commentary: Esther
JPS Bible Commentary: HaftarotJPS Bible Commentary: Haftarot
JPS Bible Commentary: JonahJPS Bible Commentary: Jonah
JPS Torah Commentary: DeuteronomyJPS Torah Commentary: Deuteronomy
JPS Torah Commentary: ExodusJPS Torah Commentary: Exodus
JPS Torah Commentary: GenesisJPS Torah Commentary: Genesis
JPS Torah Commentary: LeviticusJPS Torah Commentary: Leviticus
JPS Torah Commentary: NumbersJPS Torah Commentary: Numbers
The Torah: The Five Books of MosesThe Torah: The Five Books of Moses

 Already viewed books:
JPS Hebrew-English (Jewish Bible) TanakhJPS Hebrew-English (Jewish Bible) Tanakh


TANAKH - INTERACTIVE HEBREW BIBLE