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EDITING SUMMARY FOR THE

by JPS / Varda Books
EDITING SUMMARY FOR THE HEBREW TEXT Intended Audience Readers who want to explore meaning of the masoretic Hebrew text while and Use staying in touch with the translation; for use in study rather than in worship. Source of Text Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (BHS)* in the form of a 1987 computerized transcription; chosen for optimal accuracy and good documentation. Type Design Chose a font known for its clarity (Hadassah) and sized it for readability; custom-designed appearance of vowels and accents to reduce ambiguity. Language Alignment Lined up text columns at chapter openings and matched them within one verse at the bottom of each page, aiding the reader’s movement between text and translation. Prose Paragraphing Matched the English translation; divided text into logical units of prose according to its plain meaning, for ease of reading. Poetry Layout Matched the English translation; inserted line break between poetic phrases where the reader would normally pause, so that rhythm is apparent. Verse Numbering Placed Arabic numerals within the Hebrew text, for quick correlation with the translation. Division of Books Accommodated each of the conventional ways, arranging text both as twentyfour and as thirty-nine books. Order of Books Rearranged books as in most Hebrew printed editions, making navigation easy for readers familiar with the standard order. Spelling Variants Of minor spelling discrepancies between codex text and its marginal notes, (Orthography) resolved twenty-nine in Torah in favor of the notes; in Prophets and Writings, printed spelling as in text, regardless of marginal notes. Hymns Set classical, interwoven layout for Song of the Sea and Song of Deborah, placing gaps to coincide with syntactic pauses; set line breaks between phrases in the Song of Moses. Lists Set special, traditional layout for the conquered kings and Haman’s sons. Weekly Torah Portions Divided Torah into parashiyot (sections according to Babylonian Jewish reading tradition), for study in accord with the weekly cycle. Reading Tradition vs. Set kethib (consonantal text as written) in smaller, unpointed type; pointed the Writing Tradition qere (consontantal text as read) and placed it in the text after its kethib. Letter Size and Nequdot Set unusually large or small letters and placed special points per modern editions (Extraordinary Points) in Torah, and per BHS in Prophets and Writings. Transcription Errors Corrected hundreds of errors: BHS misreadings of its source manuscript, typos in BHS printing, and mistakes in BHS transcription onto computer. Scribal Errors Supplied missing pointing as implied by the text; deleted superfluous pointing; changed the codex text to match received texts in forty-three words where our manuscript’s reading seemed both impossible and glaring. Hebrew Footnotes Noted selected anomalies (in spelling, pointing, grammar, or meaning) and verse counts using traditional terms—spelled out and reworded for clarity; showed variant readings from other Bible manuscripts where preferred by our translators; marked ways that our edition differs from its source text. * BHS is a scientific, printed edition of the Leningrad Codex—the oldest complete masoretic manuscript of the Bible (see above, pages xi-xiii). xv

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EDITING SUMMARY FOR THE HEBREW TEXT Intended Audience Readers who want to explore meaning of the masoretic Hebrew text while and Use staying in touch with the translation; for use in study rather than in worship. Source of Text Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia (BHS)* in the form of a 1987 computerized transcription; chosen for optimal accuracy and good documentation. Type Design Chose a font known for its clarity (Hadassah) and sized it for readability; custom-designed appearance of vowels and accents to reduce ambiguity. Language Alignment Lined up text columns at chapter openings and matched them within one verse at the bottom of each page, aiding the reader’s movement between text and translation. Prose Paragraphing Matched the English translation; divided text into logical units of prose according to its plain meaning, for ease of reading. Poetry Layout Matched the English translation; inserted line break between poetic phrases where the reader would normally pause, so that rhythm is apparent. Verse Numbering Placed Arabic numerals within the Hebrew text, for quick correlation with the translation. Division of Books Accommodated each of the conventional ways, arranging text both as twentyfour and as thirty-nine books. Order of Books Rearranged books as in most Hebrew printed editions, making navigation easy for readers familiar with the \\"standard\\" order. Spelling Variants Of minor spelling discrepancies between codex text and its marginal notes, (Orthography) resolved twenty-nine in Torah in favor of the notes; in Prophets and Writings, printed spelling as in text, regardless of marginal notes. Hymns Set classical, \\"interwoven\\" layout for Song of the Sea and Song of Deborah, placing gaps to coincide with syntactic pauses; set line breaks between phrases in the Song of Moses. Lists Set special, traditional layout for the conquered kings and Haman’s sons. Weekly Torah Portions Divided Torah into parashiyot (sections according to Babylonian Jewish reading tradition), for study in accord with the weekly cycle. Reading Tradition vs. Set kethib (consonantal text as written) in smaller, unpointed type; pointed the Writing Tradition qere (consontantal text as read) and placed it in the text after its kethib. Letter Size and Nequdot Set unusually large or small letters and placed special points per modern editions (Extraordinary Points) in Torah, and per BHS in Prophets and Writings. Transcription Errors Corrected hundreds of errors: BHS misreadings of its source manuscript, typos in BHS printing, and mistakes in BHS transcription onto computer. Scribal Errors Supplied missing pointing as implied by the text; deleted superfluous pointing; changed the codex text to match \\"received\\" texts in forty-three words where our manuscript’s reading seemed both impossible and glaring. Hebrew Footnotes Noted selected anomalies (in spelling, pointing, grammar, or meaning) and verse counts using traditional terms—spelled out and reworded for clarity; showed variant readings from other Bible manuscripts where preferred by our translators; marked ways that our edition differs from its source text. * BHS is a scientific, printed edition of the Leningrad Codex—the oldest complete masoretic manuscript of the Bible (see above, pages xi-xiii). xv
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Varda Books - 1-59045-077-9


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