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INTRODUCTION xlviii 64.

by Adele Berlin
INTRODUCTION xlviii 64. Clines, 169– 74. 65. Frye, “ Minorities in the History of the Near East.” 66. See Schäfer, 93– 105. 67. ABD V, 1101. 68. Feldman, 539. See  500– 38 for a discussion of the Book of Esther. See also Feldman’s article on Josephus in ABD III, 981– 98. 69. For bibliography see Walfi  sh, Esther in Medieval Garb, 245 note 63. For an English compilation see Ginzberg, IV, 363– 448. 70. The critical edition in English is Segal, The Babylonian Esther Midrash. 71. See the editions and translation by Grossfeld. 72. Buber, Sifrei De-’ agadta’, contains Abba Gorion, Panim Aherim ( versions  A and B), and Leqah Tov. Midrash Megillat Ester is in Horowitz, 417– 75. Buber, Aggadat Ester. 73. Segal, The Babylonian Esther Midrash, I, 20. 74. Friedlander, 404; variations on this pericope occur in Panim Aherim and elsewhere. 75. See the works by Bal, Beal, Brenner, Day, Gendler, LaCocque, The Feminine Unconventional, Lubitch, Niditch, “ Short Stories,” and White, “ Esther: A Feminine Model for Jewish Diaspora.” Fox, 205– 11, re- views and critiques the pre- 1991 feminist readings of the Book of Esther. He calls the author of Esther “ something of a protofeminist” and observes that  this is the only book in the Bible “ with a conscious and sustained interest in sexual politics” ( 209). 76. For example, see Brosius, Sancici- Weerdenburg, “ Exit Atossa,” and T. Eskenazi, 25– 43. 77. Bird, “ Images of Women in the Old Testament,” in Ruether, 41. 78. For more on Esther’s role as an active character, see Fox, 199– 202.          C    h  a  p  t e  r   Home  |      T  O   C   

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INTRODUCTION xlviii 64. Clines, 169– 74. ◄ 65. Frye, “ Minorities in the History of the Near East.” ◄ 66. See Schäfer, 93– 105. ◄ 67. ABD V, 1101. ◄ 68. Feldman, 539. See 500– 38 for a discussion of the Book of Esther. See also Feldman’s article on Josephus in ABD III, 981– 98. ◄ 69. For bibliography see Walfi sh, Esther in Medieval Garb, 245 note 63. For an English compilation see Ginzberg, IV, 363– 448. ◄ 70. The critical edition in English is Segal, The Babylonian Esther Midrash. ◄ 71. See the editions and translation by Grossfeld. ◄ 72. Buber, Sifrei De-’ agadta’, contains Abba Gorion, Panim Aherim ( versions A and B), and Leqah Tov. Midrash Megillat Ester is in Horowitz, 417– 75. Buber, Aggadat Ester. ◄ 73. Segal, The Babylonian Esther Midrash, I, 20. ◄ 74. Friedlander, 404; variations on this pericope occur in Panim Aherim and elsewhere. ◄ 75. See the works by Bal, Beal, Brenner, Day, Gendler, LaCocque, The Feminine Unconventional, Lubitch, Niditch, “ Short Stories,” and White, “ Esther: A Feminine Model for Jewish Diaspora.” Fox, 205– 11, re- views and critiques the pre- 1991 feminist readings of the Book of Esther. He calls the author of Esther “ something of a protofeminist” and observes that this is the only book in the Bible “ with a conscious and sustained interest in sexual politics” ( 209). ◄ 76. For example, see Brosius, Sancici- Weerdenburg, “ Exit Atossa,” and T. Eskenazi, 25– 43. ◄ 77. Bird, “ Images of Women in the Old Testament,” in Ruether, 41. ◄ 78. For more on Esther’s role as an active character, see Fox, 199– 202. ◄ <    <      C   h  a  p  t e  r  >> Home |      T  O   C   
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