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CHAPTER XXVII RUSSIAN

by Simon M. Dubnow
CHAPTER XXVII RUSSIAN REACTION AND JEWISH EMIGRATION 1. AFTERMATH OF THE POGROM POLICY In this wise, beginning with the May laws of 1882, the Gov-ernment gradually succeeded in monopolizing all anti- Jew-ish activities by letting bureaucratic persecutions take the place of street pogroms. However, in 1883 and 1884, the “ street” made again occasional attempts to compete with the Government. On May 10, 1883, on the eve of Alexander III.’ s coronation, a pogrom took place in the large southern city of Rostov- on- the- Don. About a hundred Jewish residences and business places were demolished and plundered. All port-able property of the Jews was looted by the mob, and the rest was destroyed. As was to be expected, “ the efforts of the police and troops were unable to stop the disorders,” and only after completing their day’s work the rioters fled, pursued by lashes and shots from the Cossaks. The Russian censorship strictly barred all references to the pogroms in the newspa-pers, for fear of spoiling the solemnity of the coronation days. The press was only allowed to hint at “ alarming rumors,” the effect of which extended even to the stock exchange of Ber-lin. Not before a year had passed was permission given to make public mention of the Rostov events. There was reason to fear that the pogrom at Rostov was only a prelude to a new series of riots in the South. But more than two months had passed, and all seemed to be quiet. Sud-denly, however, on July 20, on the Greek- Orthodox festival dedicated to the memory of the prophet Elijah, the Russian   C h a p t e r Home  | T O C For use on stand- alone, non- institutional computers only. To purchase Scholar PDF version with advanced functionality, go to www. publishersrow. com

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CHAPTER XXVII RUSSIAN REACTION AND JEWISH EMIGRATION 1. AFTERMATH OF THE POGROM POLICY In this wise, beginning with the May laws of 1882, the Gov-ernment gradually succeeded in monopolizing all anti- Jew-ish activities by letting bureaucratic persecutions take the place of street pogroms. However, in 1883 and 1884, the “ street” made again occasional attempts to compete with the Government. On May 10, 1883, on the eve of Alexander III.’ s coronation, a pogrom took place in the large southern city of Rostov- on- the- Don. About a hundred Jewish residences and business places were demolished and plundered. All port-able property of the Jews was looted by the mob, and the rest was destroyed. As was to be expected, “ the efforts of the police and troops were unable to stop the disorders,” and only after completing their day’s work the rioters fled, pursued by lashes and shots from the Cossaks. The Russian censorship strictly barred all references to the pogroms in the newspa-pers, for fear of spoiling the solemnity of the coronation days. The press was only allowed to hint at “ alarming rumors,” the effect of which extended even to the stock exchange of Ber-lin. Not before a year had passed was permission given to make public mention of the Rostov events. There was reason to fear that the pogrom at Rostov was only a prelude to a new series of riots in the South. But more than two months had passed, and all seemed to be quiet. Sud-denly, however, on July 20, on the Greek- Orthodox festival dedicated to the memory of the prophet Elijah, the Russian < < C h a p t e r >> Home | T O C For use on stand- alone, non- institutional computers only. To purchase Scholar PDF version with advanced functionality, go to www. publishersrow. com
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