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62 The Individual Sounds

by E. Kautzsch
62 The Individual Sounds and Characters ι o. (—) Päzer ( see above, I,  11 a). 11 a. ( ן — ) M ® huppäkh legarmeh, i. e. Mahpäkh with a following stroke. 11b. ( ן —) , Azlä legarmeh, i. e. , Azlä with a following stroke. I B. C0NJÜNCTIVI. 12. (—-) Merekha ( see above, I.  16 a). 13. (_) Münah ( see above, I.  14). עליי (—־) . 14  Illüy or Münah superior, טךחא (__) . 15 Tarhä ( under the tone- syllable, and thus easily distinguished from No. 9). 16. (—) Galgal or Yerah ( see above, I.  20). 17. (—) Mehuppäkh or Mahpäkh ( see above, I.  15). 18. (—)  Azlä ( see above, I.  18). 19. (—) SalSeleth qetannä ( Little Salseleth). The last three are distinguished from the disjunctives of the same name by the absence of the stroke. [ 20. (—) Sinnorith, see above under No. 7.] REMAKKS ON THE ACCENTS. I. As Signs of the Tone. I. As in Greek and English ( cf. € Ϊμί and * ΐμι, compact and compact) so also in Hebrew, words which are written with the same consonants are occasionally distinguished by the position of the tone, e. g. בנו banu ( they built), בנו banu ( in us) ; קמה qama ( she stood up), יןמה qama ( standing up, ferm.). I 2. As a rule the accent stands on the tone- syllable, and properly on its initial consonant. In the case of prepositives and postpositives alone ( seeabove, e)  the tone- syllable must be ascertained independently of the accent. In many  MSS. as well as in Baers editions of the text, the postpositive sign in foretoned words stands also over the tone- syllable after the analogy of PaStä ( see above, I. 8 a,  note); e. g. טרם ישכבו Gn194;  so the prepositiveDP  Τ : · V V sign in cases like ויהי Gn 813. II. As Signs of Punctuation. f) l 3. In respect to this use of the accents, every verse is regarded as a period which closes with Sillüq, or in the figurative language of the grammarians, as a province ( ditio) which is governed by the great distinctive at the end. According as the verse is long or short, i. e. the province great or small, there are several subordinate Domini of different grades, as governors of greater and smaller divisions. When possible, the subdivisions themselves are also split up into parts according  to the law of dichotomy ( see Wiekes, The Accents of the Twenty- one Books,  p. 29 ff).— When two or more equivalent accents ( Zäqeph, Rebhia) occur consecutively,  the accent which precedes marks a  greater division than the one which follows ; cf. e. g. the Zäqeph, Gn 120A. 4 . In general a conjunctive ( Servus) unites only such words as  are closely connected in sense, e. g. a noun with a following genitive or a noun with an Chapter Home  | TOC  | Index

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62 The Individual Sounds and Characters ι o. (—) Päzer ( see above, I, 11 a). 11 a. ( ן — ) M ® huppäkh legarmeh, i. e. Mahpäkh with a following stroke. 11b. ( ן —) , Azlä legarmeh, i. e. , Azlä with a following stroke. I B. C0NJÜNCTIVI. 12. (—-) Merekha ( see above, I. 16 a). 13. (_) Münah ( see above, I. 14). עליי (—־) . 14 ' Illüy or Münah superior, טךחא (__) . 15 Tarhä ( under the tone- syllable, and thus easily distinguished from No. 9). 16. (—) Galgal or Yerah ( see above, I. 20). 17. (—) Mehuppäkh or Mahpäkh ( see above, I. 15). 18. (—) ' Azlä ( see above, I. 18). 19. (—) SalSeleth qetannä ( Little Salseleth). The last three are distinguished from the disjunctives of the same name by the absence of the stroke. [ 20. (—) Sinnorith, see above under No. 7.] REMAKKS ON THE ACCENTS. I. As Signs of the Tone. I. As in Greek and English ( cf. € Ϊμί and * ΐμι, compact and compact) so also in Hebrew, words which are written with the same consonants are occasionally distinguished by the position of the tone, e. g. בנו banu ( they built), בנו banu ( in us) ; קמה qama ( she stood up), יןמה qama ( standing up, ferm.). I 2. As a rule the accent stands on the tone- syllable, and properly on its initial consonant. In the case of prepositives and postpositives alone ( see above, e) the tone- syllable must be ascertained independently of the accent. In many MSS. as well as in Baer's editions of the text, the postpositive sign in foretoned words stands also over the tone- syllable after the analogy of PaStä ( see above, I. 8 a, note); e. g. טרם ישכבו Gn194; so the prepositive DP Τ : · V V sign in cases like ויהי Gn 813. II. As Signs of Punctuation. f) l 3. In respect to this use of the accents, every verse is regarded as a period which closes with Sillüq, or in the figurative language of the grammarians, as a province ( ditio) which is governed by the great distinctive at the end. According as the verse is long or short, i. e. the province great or small, there are several subordinate Domini of different grades, as governors of greater and smaller divisions. When possible, the subdivisions themselves are also split up into parts according to the law of dichotomy ( see Wiekes, The Accents of the Twenty- one Books, p. 29 ff).— When two or more equivalent accents ( Zäqeph, Rebhia') occur consecutively, the accent which precedes marks a greater division than the one which follows ; cf. e. g. the Zäqeph, Gn 120A. 4 . In general a conjunctive ( Servus) unites only such words as are closely connected in sense, e. g. a noun with a following genitive or a noun with an << Chapter >> Home | TOC | Index
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