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CHAPTER II THE SENTENCE

by E. Kautzsch
CHAPTER II THE SENTENCE I. The Sentence in General. § 140. Noun- clauses, Verbal- clauses, and the Compound Sentence. a 1. Every sentence, the subject and predicate of which are nouns or their equivalents ( esp. participles), is called a noun- clause, e. g. יהוה מלכנו the Lord is our king, Is  3322; ואנ^ י סדים חןים וחטאים now the nun of Sodom  were wicked and sinners,  Gn 1313; 3 ה להם a mouththeirs, ψ 1155;  see further, § 141. b 2. Every sentence, the subject of which is a noun ( or pronoun included in a verbal- form) and its predicate a finite verb, is called a verbal- clause, e. g. ףאמר אלהים and God said,  Gn 13; רבזלל and hedivided, 17;  see further, § 142. C Rem. In the last example the pronominal subject is at least indicated by the preformative ( י ), and in almost all forms of the perfect by afformatives. The 3rd pers. sing. perf. however, which contains no indication of the subject, must also be regarded as a full verbal- clause. d 3. Every sentence, the subject or predicate of  which is itself a full clause, is called a compound sentence, e.  g. ψ 1831 ^ האל תמים ךךכ God— his way is perfect, equivalent to Gods way is perfect;  Gn 348 בני הקכןה נפשו בבתכם my son Shechem— his soul longeth  for your daughter; see further, § 143. e 4. The above distinction between different kinds of sentences— especially between noun- and verbal- clauses— is indispensable to the more delicate appreciation of Hebrew syntax ( and that of the Semitic languages generally), since it is by no means merely external or formal, but involves fundamental differences of meaning. Noun-clauses with a substantive as predicate, represent something fixed, a state or in short, a being so and so; verbal- clauses on the other hand, something moveable and in progress, an event or action. The latter description is indeed true in a certain sense also of noun- clauses Chapter Home  | TOC  | Index

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CHAPTER II THE SENTENCE I. The Sentence in General. § 140. Noun- clauses, Verbal- clauses, and the Compound Sentence. a 1. Every sentence, the subject and predicate of which are nouns or their equivalents ( esp. participles), is called a noun- clause, e. g. יהוה מלכנו the Lord is our king, Is 3322; ואנ^ י סדים חןים וחטאים now the nun of Sodom were wicked and sinners, Gn 1313; 3 ה להם a mouth theirs, ψ 1155; see further, § 141. b 2. Every sentence, the subject of which is a noun ( or pronoun included in a verbal- form) and its predicate a finite verb, is called a verbal- clause, e. g. ףאמר אלהים and God said, Gn 13; רבזלל and he divided, 17; see further, § 142. C Rem. In the last example the pronominal subject is at least indicated by the preformative ( י ), and in almost all forms of the perfect by afformatives. The 3rd pers. sing. perf. however, which contains no indication of the subject, must also be regarded as a full verbal- clause. d 3. Every sentence, the subject or predicate of which is itself a full clause, is called a compound sentence, e. g. ψ 1831 ^ האל תמים ךךכ God— his way is perfect, equivalent to God's way is perfect; Gn 348 בני הקכןה נפשו בבתכם my son Shechem— his soul longeth for your daughter; see further, § 143. e 4. The above distinction between different kinds of sentences— especially between noun- and verbal- clauses— is indispensable to the more delicate appreciation of Hebrew syntax ( and that of the Semitic languages generally), since it is by no means merely external or formal, but involves fundamental differences of meaning. Noun-clauses with a substantive as predicate, represent something fixed, a state or in short, a being so and so; verbal- clauses on the other hand, something moveable and in progress, an event or action. The latter description is indeed true in a certain sense also of noun- clauses << Chapter >> Home | TOC | Index
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