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Girdle of the land. 9 first and last clause of this place quoted; which may have some tendency towards our entrance into our present busi-ness. The rest ( if there be any we can attain unto) we shall handle in their proper places.  These ( say they) are the bounds of the land of Israel, which they possessed that came out of BabyIon.  פרשת חרמת מגדל שיד  The division, or part, of the walls of the tower Sid.  Nor dare I confidently to assert, that this is spoken of the  tower of Strato,  or  Caesarea;  nor yet do I know to what it may more fitly be applied. We observe in its place, that that tower is called by the Tal-mudists, מגדל שיר  The tower Sir:  which, by how very little a point it differs from this word, and how very apt it is by want of care in writing to be confounded with it, the eye of any reader is witness. It may  happily confirm this con-jecture, that עור the name Aco°,  so soon follows, שיג דררר only coming between. Concerning which we have nothing to say, if that, which we meet with in the writers of the Baby- Ionian Talmud, may not have any place here. They sayP, תא אשינא דטררא : which by the glosser is rendered, ברא דרך תחתית ההרים , & c. ״ Go in the lowest way, below the mountains,  and they will protect you from showers and rain. Hence, therefore, it may be supposed, that the word שינ doth denote some way at the foot of some mountainous place, which was, as it were, the dividing line between the  land of Israel,  and  without the land;  perhaps at the foot of mount Carmel: — but we do not assert it: we had rather profess silence or ignorance, than, by a light conjecture, either to deceive others or be deceived ourselves. These places, concerning which the Talmudists here treat, are of a different condition from those, which were called מדינת היט  The region of the sea.  For those places were certain towns, here and there, on this sea- coast, and elsewhere; which were, indeed, inhabited by heathens, and so could not properly be reckoned the  land of Israel;  yet they were such, as between which, and the outmost bounds of the land, was again the land of Israel. But these places, which we are now handling, are those, which were the utmost bounds, and beyond which were no places at all, but what ° Leusderís edition, vol. ii. p. 171.  ρ Bab. Sanhedrim, fol. 96. 2.   Chapter Home t t

Commentary on the New Testament from the Talmud and Hebraica Vol.1


About Book Commentary on the New Testament from the Talmud and Hebraica Vol.1

Front MatterTitle PageCopyright PageTHE PREFACEContentsCHOROGRAPHICAL CENTURYI. The Division of the Land.II. The Talmudic Girdle of the Land under the second Temple, taken out of the Jerusalem Sheviith.III. A great part of south Judea cut off under the second Temple. Jewish Idumea.IV. The seven Seas according to the Talmudists, and the four Rivers compassing the Land.V. The Sea of Sodom, ?? ????VI. The Coast of the Asphaltites, The Essenes. En-gedi.VII. Kadesh. ??? , and that double. Inquiry is made. Whether the doubling it in the Maps is well done.VIII. The River of Egypt, Rhinocorura. The Lake of Sirbon.IX. A Sight of Judea.X. A Description of the Sea-coast, out of Pliny and Strabo.XI. The mountainous Country of Judea.XII. The South Country. ?? ??? ????? ????? . Judea called ???? ' the South,' in respect of Galilee.XIII. Gaza.XIV. Ascalon. Gerar. The Story of the Eighty Witches.XV. Jabneh. Jamnia.XVI. Lydda. ???XVII. Sharon. Caphar Lodim. ???? ????? The Village of those of Lydda.XVIII. Caphar Tebi. ??? ???XIX. The northern coast of Judea. Beth-horon.XX. Beth-el. Beth-aven.XXI. Jerusalem.XXII. The parts of the City. Sion. ??? p????, the Upper City: which was on the north part.XXIII. The buildings of more eminent note in Sion.XXIV. Some buildings in Acra. Bezeiha. Millo.XXV. Gihon, the same with the Fountain of Siloam.XXVI. The Girdle of the City. Neh. iii.XXVII. Mount Moriah.XXVIII. The Court of the Gentiles. ? ? ???? The Mountain of the House, in the Rabbins.XXIX. Chel. The Court of the Women.XXX. The Gate of Nicanor, or the East Gate of the Court of Israel.XXXI. Concerning the Gates and Chambers lying on the South Side of the Court.XXXII. The Gates and Doors on the North Side.XXXIII. The Court itself.XXXIV. The Altar. The Rings. The Laver.XXXV. Some other memorable Places of the City.XXXVI. Synagogues in the City; and Schools.XXXVII. Bethphage. ??? ???.XXXVIII. Kedron.XXXIX. The Valley of Hinnom, ?? ????.XL. Mount Olivet. ?? ?????.XLI. Bethany. ??? ? ? ? ? ? Beth-hene.XLII. ???? • S??tt??. Scopo.XLIII. Ramah. Ramathaim Zophim. Gibeah.XLIV. Nob. Bahurim.XLV. Emmaus. Kiriath-jearim.XLVI. The country of Jericho, and the situation of the City.XLVII. Jericho itself.XLVIII. Some miscellaneous matters belonging to the Country about Jericho.XLIX. Hebron.L. Of the cities of Refuge.LI. Beth-lehem.LII. Betar. ????LIII. ???? , Ephraim. LIV. ??? Tsok: and ???? ??? , Beth Chadudo.LV. Divers matters.LVI. Samaria. Sychem.LVII. Caesarea. ?????? St??t????. Strato's Tower.LVIII. Antipatris. ???? ??? Caphar Salama.LIX. Galilee. ????.LX. Scythopolis. ???? ??? ßeth-shean, the beginning of Galilee.LXI. Caphar Hananiah, ??? ????? . The Middle of Galilee.LXII. The disposition of the tribes in Galilee.LXIII. The west coast of Galilee-Carmel.LXIV. Acon, ??? . Ptolemais.LXV. Ecdippa. Achzib. Josh. xix. 29. Judg. i. 31. ???µa??????? Climax of the Tyrians.LXVI. The northern coasts of Galilee. Amanah. The mountain of snow.LXVII. ????? ?amias. ?aneas, the spring of Jordan.LXVIII. What is to be said of ??? ?????? , the sea of Apamia.LXIX. The lake Samochonitis [or Semechonitis.]LXX. The lake of Gennesaret; or, the sea of Galilee and Tiberias.LXXI. Within what tribe the lake of Gennesaret was.LXXII. Tiberias.LXXIII. Of the Situation of Tiberias.LXXIV. ??? Chammath. Ammaus. ??? ????? The warm bathsof Tiberias.LXXV. Gadara. ???LXXVI. Magdala.LXXVII. Hippo. ?????? Susitha.LXXVIII. Some other towns near Tiberias. ??? ???? Beth-Meon. ??? ????? Caphar Chittaia. ????? Paltathah.LXXIX. The country of Gennesaret.LXXX.Capernaum.LXXXI. Some history of Tiberias. The Jerusalem Talmud was written there: and when.LXXXII. ? ? ? ? ? Tsippo. LXXXIII. Some Places bordering upon Tsippor. ???? Jeshanah. ???? Ketsarah. ????? Shihin.LXXXIV. ???? Usha.LXXXV. Arbel. Shezor. ??????? ????? Tarnegola the Upper.LXXXVI. The difference of some customs of the Galileans those of Judea.LXXXVII. The dialect of the Galileans, differing from the Jewish.LXXXVIII. ? ? ? ? Gilgal, in Deut. xi. 30: what that place was.LXXXIX. Divers towns called by the name of ??? Tyre.XC. Cana.XCI. Perea. ??? ????? Beyond Jordan.XCII. Adam and Zaretan, Josh. iii.XCIII. Julias -Bethsaida.XCIV. Gamala. Chorazin.XCV. Some towns upon the very limits of the land. Out of the Jerusalem Talmud, Demai, fol. 22. 4.XCVI. The consistories of more note: out of the Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedr. fol. 32. 2.XCVII. The cities of the Levites.XCVIII. Some miscellaneous matters respecting the face of the land.XCIX. Subterraneous places. Mines. Caves.C. Of the places of Burial.CONTENTS OF THE CHOROGRAPHICAL CENTURYCHOROGRAPHICAL DECADI. Idumea1. Idumea: Mark iii. 8.2. A few things of Pelusium.3. Casiotis.4. Rhinocorura. The Arabic Interpreter noted.5. The country of the Avites: a part of the new Idumea.6. The whole portion of Simeon within Idumea.7. The whole southern country of Judea within Idumea.8. Of the third Palestine, or Palestine called 'the Healthful.'II. ???µ??, ' The wilderness;'1. The wilderness: Mark i. 4, 12.2. The wilderness of Judah.3. A scheme of Asphaltites, and of the wilderness of Judah, or Idumea adjacent.4. The wilderness of Judea, where John Baptist was5. ?6?? a????? wild honey; Mark i. 6.6. —?e??????? t?? *???da???* The region round about Jordan. Matt. iii. 5.III. Various Corbans1. ?a??f??????? the Treasury; Mark2. The Corban chests.3. The Corban ??? ? chamber.4. Where the ?a??f???????, treasury, was.5. Gad Javan in the Temple.6. Jerusalem, in Herodotus, is Cadytis.7. The streets of Jerusalem.8. The street leading from the Temple towards Olivet.VI. '? ??µ? ?ate?a?t?' The village over-against; Mark xi. 2.1. A sabbath-day's journey.2. Shops in mount Olivet.3. The lavatory of Bethany.4. Migdal Eder.5. The Seventy Interpreters noted.6. The pomp of those that offered the first-fruits.V. Dalmanutha. Mark viii. 10.1. A scheme of the sea of Gennesaret, and places adjacent.2. Zalmon. Thence DalmanuthaVI. Op?a ????? ?a? S????? The coasts of Tyre and Sidon; Mark vii. 24.1. The maps too officious.2. Opiov A coast.3. The Greek Interpreters noted.4. Midland Phoenicia.5. Of the Sabbatic river.VII. The region of Decapolis, what; Mark vii. 30.1. The region of Decapolis not well placed by some.2. Scythopolis, heretofore ??? ??? Beth-shean,one of the Decapolitan cities.3. Gadara and Hippo, cities of Decapolis.4. Pella, a city of Decapolis.5. Caphar Tsemach. Beth Gubrin. Caphar Carnaim.6. Caesarea Philippi.7. The city ???? Orbo,VIII. Some measurings.1. The measures of the jews.2. The Jews' measuring out the land by diets.3. The Talmudists' measuring the breadth of the land within Jordan.4. Ptolemy consulted and amended.5. Pliny to be corrected.6. The length of the land, out of Antoninus.7. The breadth of the ways.8. The distance of sepulchres from cities.IX. Some places scatteringly noted.1. The Roman garrisons.2. Zin ??? . Cadesh ? ? ? .3. Ono. ?? X. Of the various inhabitants of the land.1. It was the land of the Hebrews before it was the Canaanites'.2. Whence Canaan was a part only of Canaan, Judg. iv. 2.3. The Perizzites, who.4. The Kenites.5. Rephaim. CONTENTSOF THE CHOROGRAPHICAL DECADCHOROGRAPHICAL NOTESI. Of the places mentioned in Luke iii.1. Some historical passages concerning the territories of Herod.2. Whether Perea may not also be called Galilee.3. Some things in general concerning the country beyond Jordan.4. Trachonitis.5. Auranitis.6. Iturea.7. Abilene.8. Sam. xx. 18 discussed.II. Sarepta.1. Zarephath, Obad. ver. 20. where.2. Sepharad, where.3. The situation of Sarepta.III. Nain. Luke vii. 11.1. Concerning Nain near Tabor, shewn to strangers.2. Concerning the Nain or Naim in Josephus and the Rabbins.3. Engannim.IV. Emmaus. Luke xxiv.1. Several things about its name and place.2. Its situation.3. Some story of it. Also of Timnath and mount Gilead, Judg. vii. 3.CONTENTS OF THE CHOROGRAPHICAL NOTES.CHOKOGMPHICAL INQUIRYI. Bethabara. John i.1. Different reading's, ???a??a and ???aµa??.2. The noted passages over Jordan.3. The Scythopolitan country.4. ?Eya ped??? The great plain: the Scythopolitan passage there.5. Beth-barah, Judg. vii. 24.II. Nazareth, John i. 45.1. A legend not much unlike that of the Chapel of Loretto.2. The situation of Nazareth.3. Ben Nezer.4. Certain horrid practices in • ??? ???Capharnachum.5. Some short remarks upon Cana, john ii. 2.III. ????? ????? t?? Sa???µ, AEnon near Salim. John iii. 23.1. Certain names and places of near sound with Sa?e?µ, ' Salim. '2. a' Salmean' or a' Salamean, ' used amongst the Targumists instead of ???? a ' Kenite.3. ????? in the Greek Interpreter, Joshua xv. 62.4. The Syriac remarked. And Eustathius upon Dionysius.5. Herodium, a palace.6. Machaerus, a castle.7. The hill Mizaar. ?? ???? Psalm xlii. 6.8. Eglath Shelishijah,Isa. xv. 5IV. S????. John iv. 5.1. A few remarks upon the Samaritan affairs.1. Of the name of the Cuthites.2. Josephus mistaken.3. Samaria planted with colonies two several times4. Of Dosthai, the pseud-apostle of the Samaritans5. The language of Ashdod, Neh. xiii. 24, whether the Samaritan language or no ?2. The Samaritan Pentateuch.3. The situation of the mounts Gerizim and Ebal. The Samaritan text upon Deut. xxvii. 4 noted.4. Why it is written Sychar, and not Sychem.5. Ain Socar, in the Talmud.V. Bethesda, John v. 2.1. The situation of the Probatica.2. The fountain of Siloam, and its streams.3. The pool ??? Shelahh, and the pool ???? shiloah.4. The Targumist on Eccles. ii. 5 noted.5. The fountain of Etam. The water-gate.VI. St?a t?? S???µ??t??. Solomon's Porch, John x. 23.1. Some obscure hints of the Gate of Huldah, and the Priest's Gate.2. Solomon's Porch; which it was, and where.3. The Gate of Shushan. The assembly of theTwenty-three there. The tabernae, or 'shops, things were sold for the Temple.4. Short hints of the condition of the second Temple.VII. Various things.1. ?f?a?µ, 'Ephraim,' John xi. 54.2. 'Beth Maron,' and ????? 'A Maronite.'3. Chalamish, Naveh, and other obscure places.4. ?afe?a?a, Chaphenatha, 1 Macc. xii. 37.5. The Targum of Jonathan upon Numb. xxxiv. 8, noted.Contentsa of the Chorographical InquiryVolume 2Volume 3Volume 4
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