Varda Books



 View book pages:
 Buy this book:
  eBookshuk
  




4.4 Ultimately Stressed

by Zeev Ben-Hayyim
4.4  Ultimately Stressed Nominal Forms  293 also yields yesuwwättäk y\\ yw\\ yesuwwättu wyw. That this is not an unbreak­able rule we learn from forms such as yäsäräk ( * yäsääräk, or perhaps di­rectly from * yasharak)  pnr. 4.4.6 Special Instances a. The difference in vowels between such ultimately- stressed forms as qärät nmp and gäbät nma on the one hand, and qädet nmp ( cognate to what would be nrnp* in TH) and sabbet nnso on the other, derives from an earlier difference between vowels: e, which developed from either i or u in PS. Thus, qädet can be explained on the basis of either * qadtht or * qaduht, sabbet on the basis of either * sappiht or * sappubt. Cf. the coexisting TH forms msa and nixa. b. The word säfet nsnw teaches us that the alternation nsrw/ nnsw is not just an orthographical variation, but that the word in its given pronunciation is derived from rrsw, a cognate of » pro in a fashion similar to nwn/ ra: and naW c. The noun ayyälä nVw has none of the characteristic causes of ultimate stress surveyed above, unless we say that the melody in one mode of recitation gave the word this stress ( as noted in L O T III/ 2, 140,1. 79), or unless we say the word is derived from something like nx^ x* ( meaning  in the image of a ram), as we find in Targum Pseudo- Jonathan to Gn 49: 21: xV^ ai ( see L OT III/ l, 35, at 1. 21). The latter possibility requires further inquiry. d. From sebuwwä nynrc we have the form missebütti w n r a ( Gn 24: 8). The gemination can be explained on the basis of a form like * sebu ti with the vowel-less feminine suffix t, perhaps by analogy to what appears in 4.4.5. e. Further evidence of the alternation of stress between ultimate and penul­timate syllables noted above in 4.4.4 is provided by the relationship between etat nxen and  atat nxon ( the sacrifice), which exists even though the base con­ditions were identical: something like * bataat. ( See also L O T III/ l, 52, at 1. 14.) f. The word niyya is apparently derived from * nibaah  * nayhaah, with a short a vowel like the one in TH nrra. 65 g. The form bälil bybi in composed of two words, but the compounding is no longer transparent. The SH form is derived from * bali+ yil. 4.5 Gender and Number 4.5.1 Nouns, like verbs and pronouns, have two genders: masculine and femi­nine. Masculine nouns bear no special suffix marking gender, while feminine nouns are for the most part formed from a masculine noun with the addition of one of the suffixes written in SP ( as in MT): π-, η- ( MT n r , n^), m-, and nv Chapter Home  | TOC  | Index

Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  
4.4 Ultimately Stressed Nominal Forms 293 also yields yesuwwättäk y\\\\ yw\\\\ yesuwwättu wyw. That this is not an unbreak­able rule we learn from forms such as yäsäräk (< * yäsä'äräk, or perhaps di­rectly from * yasharak) \\" pnr. 4.4.6 Special Instances a. The difference in vowels between such ultimately- stressed forms as qä'rät nmp and gä'bät nma on the one hand, and qä'det nmp ( cognate to what would be nrnp* in TH) and sab'bet nnso on the other, derives from an earlier difference between vowels: e, which developed from either i or u in PS. Thus, qä'det can be explained on the basis of either * qadtht or * qaduht, sab'bet on the basis of either * sappiht or * sappubt. Cf. the coexisting TH forms msa and nixa. b. The word sä'fet nsnw teaches us that the alternation nsrw/ nnsw is not just an orthographical variation, but that the word in its given pronunciation is derived from rrsw, a cognate of » pro in a fashion similar to nwn/ ra: and naW c. The noun ayyä'lä nVw has none of the characteristic causes of ultimate stress surveyed above, unless we say that the melody in one mode of recitation gave the word this stress ( as noted in L O T III/ 2, 140,1. 79), or unless we say the word is derived from something like nx^ x* ( meaning \\" in the image of a ram\\"), as we find in Targum Pseudo- Jonathan to Gn 49: 21: xV^ ai ( see L OT III/ l, 35, at 1. 21). The latter possibility requires further inquiry. d. From sebuw'wä nynrc we have the form missebütti w n r a ( Gn 24: 8). The gemination can be explained on the basis of a form like * sebu\\" ti with the vowel-less feminine suffix t, perhaps by analogy to what appears in 4.4.5. e. Further evidence of the alternation of stress between ultimate and penul­timate syllables noted above in 4.4.4 is provided by the relationship between e'tat nxen and ' atat nxon ( the sacrifice), which exists even though the base con­ditions were identical: something like * bata'at. ( See also L O T III/ l, 52, at 1. 14.) f. The word niy'ya is apparently derived from * niba'ah < * nayha'ah, with a short a vowel like the one in TH nrra. 65 g. The form bä'lil bybi in composed of two words, but the compounding is no longer transparent. The SH form is derived from * bali+ yi'l. 4.5 Gender and Number 4.5.1 Nouns, like verbs and pronouns, have two genders: masculine and femi­nine. Masculine nouns bear no special suffix marking gender, while feminine nouns are for the most part formed from a masculine noun with the addition of one of the suffixes written in SP ( as in MT): π-, η- ( MT n r , n^), m-, and nv << Chapter >> Home | TOC | Index
Zoom in  zoom  Zoom out
  << Topic >>             |<   <<    Page       >>   >|  

Varda Books - 1-59045-916-4


 Other related titles:
Hebrew-English Tanakh: the Jewish BibleHebrew-English Tanakh: the Jewish Bible

 Already viewed books:
A Grammar of Samaritan HebrewA Grammar of Samaritan Hebrew


TANAKH - INTERACTIVE HEBREW BIBLE