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4.1 Simple Noun Patterns

by Zeev Ben-Hayyim
4.1 Simple Noun Patterns 261 A. Forms with Geminated Second Radicals and Similar Forms Note: fiqqdd — see 4.1.4.4 note. 4.1.4.1 fiqqdd. This form is used for only a few words. It is sometimes a) an alternate form of faqqdd and fdqqdd in which the original a became i in a departure from the norm: riggdz = ΤΗ τη, illdm  * alldm ( and not * ilhm, see 4.1.3.14) tf? x; * iyydb, declined as iyyabdk l- nx, iyydbdk fanx, iyydbo vanx, as against the absolute form uyydb ( see 4.1.4.10); siddi  * sidday HW; kirkdb 3 SID; and it is sometimes b) the result of the gemination of y in the transition  from i to another vowel, such as siyydd = ΤΗ τψ, from τψ* ( see 1.3.3); 2 2  tiyyamam ( * fidmdm) ΟΉΐχη. Thus, SH preserves, in the spelling r x and the aforemen­tionedpronunciation,  an earlier noun of the qattäl type, as indeed in Akkadian we find ajjäbu( m). 23  The u vowel in the absolute form uyydb may have been influenced by the participle as it appears in TH, i. e., it is a hybrid form. 24 4.1.4.2 fiqqod. As expected according to the rules of SH, this form unites nouns differentiated in TH by holem and sureq, such as pan rimmon, rimmüni; orrmpw siqqüsJyyimma; uybbygillülikimma. In addition, however, there are SH nouns of this form whose TH cognates have simple second radicals. Those of the toys form include ) wb lisson, lissünu; pmitton, ittündk; nrmsibbüna. Those of the toys form include sibbuwwddm D^ yinw. Those of the toys form include  1133 bikkor, ητχ izzob, nsx ibbod, toxw siyyol. This SH form represents several ( hypothetical) PS patterns, e. g., qatäl ftinx), qatül ( yav), qattäl ( liaa), quttäl ( pan), qutul ( nisx), and perhaps also qitäl ( e. g., TISX). The development oisdwa into a full vowel caused onsx and onia* to take the same form: sibbürdm, gibbürdm. In contrast, the ü vowel of wisküli ^ towxi ( thus SP Dt 32: 32) is not derived from sawa, but instead from PS ä, as attested by the Arabic JI £ SI ( JLllc) and Aramaic x^ ibnx ( Onqelos to Gn 40: 10). 2 2 Similar to the relationship of Tip I τψ is the SA pair pü/ lKü = * tiyyan in Hammelis ( LOT II, 468b, 1. 311), and in MS Μ to Gn 14: 10 the word appears: Dyü,  i. e, both spellings, Dyü and Iyo, are proposed. These spellings, too, provide support for ) ΐψ. 2 3 The double / is the spelling used by W. von Soden in his AHw,  I, 23ff., while CAD A Part I, 222, has a simple  j .  Both, however, certainly intend the same form. This form and not the participle is reflected in a letter from Byblos in El Amarna tablet 102,1. 2 7 ( J. A. Knudtzon, Die El- Amarna- Tafeln [ Aalen, 1964], 456):  ha- ia- b[ i- i] a, in which the letter b takes the place of a pronounced Western Semitic x. 2 4 It is true that the noun : rK appears  in the Pentateuch without τ when it is not in its absolute state, but one cannot infer from the orthography that the vowel u exists in the absolute state and is absent in declension. In fact, it may be that the orthography follows the pronunciation. The word aK in Hebrew, then, has two different traditions: 3? ix and 3^ K*  ( in SH), and a development of the latter form is reflected in the personal name 3iX ( like liaa). Chapter Home  | TOC  | Index t t t

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4.1 Simple Noun Patterns 261 A. Forms with Geminated Second Radicals and Similar Forms Note: fiqqdd — see 4.1.4.4 note. 4.1.4.1 fiqqdd. This form is used for only a few words. It is sometimes a) an alternate form of faqqdd and fdqqdd in which the original a became i in a departure from the norm: riggdz = ΤΗ τη, illdm < * alldm ( and not * ilhm, see 4.1.3.14) tf? x; * iyydb, declined as iyyabdk l- nx, iyydbdk fanx, iyydbo vanx, as against the absolute form uyydb ( see 4.1.4.10); siddi < * sidday HW; kirkdb 3' SID; and it is sometimes b) the result of the gemination of y in the transition from i to another vowel, such as siyydd = ΤΗ τψ, from τψ* ( see 1.3.3); 2 2 tiyyamam (< * fi'dmdm) ΟΉΐχη. Thus, SH preserves, in the spelling r x and the aforemen­tioned pronunciation, an earlier noun of the qattäl type, as indeed in Akkadian we find ajjäbu( m). 23 The u vowel in the absolute form uyydb may have been influenced by the participle as it appears in TH, i. e., it is a hybrid form. 24 4.1.4.2 fiqqod. As expected according to the rules of SH, this form unites nouns differentiated in TH by holem and sureq, such as pan rimmon, rimmüni; orrmpw siqqüsJyyimma; uybbygillülikimma. In addition, however, there are SH nouns of this form whose TH cognates have simple second radicals. Those of the toys form include ) wb lisson, lissünu; pmitton, ittündk; nrmsibbüna. Those of the toys form include sibbuwwd'dm D^ yinw. Those of the toys form include \\" 1133 bikkor, ητχ izzob, nsx ibbod, toxw siyyol. This SH form represents several ( hypothetical) PS patterns, e. g., qatäl ftinx), qatül ( yav), qattäl (\\" liaa), quttäl ( pan), qutul ( nisx), and perhaps also qitäl ( e. g., TISX). The development oisdwa into a full vowel caused onsx and onia* to take the same form: sibbürdm, gibbürdm. In contrast, the ü vowel of wisküli ^ towxi ( thus SP Dt 32: 32) is not derived from sawa, but instead from PS ä, as attested by the Arabic JI £ SI ( JLllc) and Aramaic x^ ibnx ( Onqelos to Gn 40: 10). 2 2 Similar to the relationship of Tip I τψ is the SA pair pü/ lK'ü = * tiyyan in Hammelis ( LOT II, 468b, 1. 311), and in MS Μ to Gn 14: 10 the word appears: D'yü, i. e, both spellings, D'yü and I'yo, are proposed. These spellings, too, provide support for ) ΐψ. 2 3 The double \\"/\\" is the spelling used by W. von Soden in his AHw, I, 23ff., while CAD A Part I, 222, has a simple \\" j . \\" Both, however, certainly intend the same form. This form and not the participle is reflected in a letter from Byblos in El Amarna tablet 102,1. 2 7 ( J. A. Knudtzon, Die El- Amarna- Tafeln [ Aalen, 1964], 456): ha- ia- b[ i- i] a, in which the letter b takes the place of a pronounced Western Semitic x. 2 4 It is true that the noun : rK appears in the Pentateuch without τ when it is not in its absolute state, but one cannot infer from the orthography that the vowel u exists in the absolute state and is absent in declension. In fact, it may be that the orthography follows the pronunciation. The word a'K in Hebrew, then, has two different traditions: 3? ix and 3^ K* ( in SH), and a development of the latter form is reflected in the personal name 3i'X ( like \\" liaa). << Chapter >> Home | TOC | Index t t t
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