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258 Noun 4.1.3.16 Special

by Zeev Ben-Hayyim
258  Noun 4.1.3.16 Special Instances 1. From the noun yähd and its declension yäliddm, etc., it is evident that the two TH forms τ £ and have merged into one; however, corresponding to ydsirdtn in SH ( SP wnw » ) we do not find TUT (= Modern Hebrew Tizr) in its absolute state, but only mr as in TH. 2. The noun mini na ( Nu 17: 25), as opposed to marydk - pa, can be de­rived from * marri  * mari. It seems, though, the distinction between the roots • na and τ ι » has been blurred, evidence for which can be mustered from  irona ( Job 23: 2) rendered by the Aramaic version as na^ anna. This may be the origin of the i vowel after the a, since ma ( Gn 26: 35) is pronounced properly as mirrat. 3. The word lä: mdt nay1? indicates to us that it is derived from the root DMay, and not, as is commonly stated, from oMay. The form parallels something like nay*. 4.1.3.17 fäqad, fdqad, fäqäd. Since the nouns in the first two of these patterns end in an original guttural, one might consider them to be merely variants of fäqddlfäqdd, e. g., qäma ( TH nap) like  äbdd nay, säsa yow like mdhk - f? a, qära ( TH rnp, but rnp personal name in 2 Kgs 25: 23) and gäba ( TH naa) like  äras ( TH inn), gäba ( TH naa) like sädb ans, and so on, while säma yaw can also be understood as an infinitive absolute. Because nouns Ill- guttural may also be found in the fäqäd pattern, however — färä ( TH yna, ma), sard ( TH πτο), täräkkimma üannü — we cannot posit a substitution of a for a as the second radical, leaving us no choice but to regard these as independent patterns. A considerable portion of these nouns are segholate in TH. The rest are derived from other PS patterns: qatal, such as: ydtad ΊΤΡ ( Arabic jhj), yätdr τη* ( Arabic j hj), gäbdn ] 3Λ,  äqäswpy, gäba nan ( in Syriac we find χπτρ and xnaa);  qvtäl (= Vys), such as: bäsäi wya ( Ex 36: 8), akin to a TH  wya* form; 1 9  and qatul, such as: gäba ( TH naa) and perhaps sätäm onw. The developments within SH may be explained on the basis of this assumption. 4.1.3.18 It is relevant to know that the auxiliary vowel that developed in the monosyllabic patterns — the TH segholates — is a here, which is unusual, since we would assume that the origin of äkäl is the same as that of TH Vax because of aklimma oVax, that qäbdr is the cognate of nap because of qabri and qabru, and even that säkär may be the cognate of Tat? ( Pr 11: 18) and, therefore, its declension is sakru. We need not add that gäddl is TH Via, as is evident from 1 9 The use of the feqqäd pattern in the function of the infinitive in SA — and not only in SA— is clearly attested by the interchange of  » KSD/ TSD in ST Ex 5: 23 to express wassdl ( TH Vsm). This pattern is also common in MH with  V roots, e. g.,  ΚΏΤ ( doubt whether  the tithe was [ properly] taken),  XVA ( an open place),  WS ( vacancy, emptiness). Chapter Home  | TOC  | Index t

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258 Noun 4.1.3.16 Special Instances 1. From the noun yähd and its declension yäliddm, etc., it is evident that the two TH forms τ £ and have merged into one; however, corresponding to ydsirdtn in SH ( SP wnw » ) we do not find TUT (= Modern Hebrew Tizr) in its absolute state, but only mr as in TH. 2. The noun mini na ( Nu 17: 25), as opposed to marydk - pa, can be de­rived from * marri < * mari. It seems, though, the distinction between the roots •\\" na and τ ι » has been blurred, evidence for which can be mustered from ' irona ( Job 23: 2) rendered by the Aramaic version as na^ anna. This may be the origin of the i vowel after the a, since ma ( Gn 26: 35) is pronounced properly as mirrat. 3. The word lä: mdt nay1? indicates to us that it is derived from the root DMay, and not, as is commonly stated, from oMay. The form parallels something like nay*. 4.1.3.17 fäqad, fdqad, fäqäd. Since the nouns in the first two of these patterns end in an original guttural, one might consider them to be merely variants of fäqddlfäqdd, e. g., qäma ( TH nap) like ' äbdd nay, säsa yow like mdhk - f? a, qära ( TH rnp, but rnp personal name in 2 Kgs 25: 23) and gäba ( TH naa) like ' äras ( TH inn), gäba ( TH naa) like sä'db ans, and so on, while säma yaw can also be understood as an infinitive absolute. Because nouns Ill- guttural may also be found in the fäqäd pattern, however — färä ( TH yna, ma), sard ( TH πτο), täräkkimma üannü — we cannot posit a substitution of a for a as the second radical, leaving us no choice but to regard these as independent patterns. A considerable portion of these nouns are segholate in TH. The rest are derived from other PS patterns: qatal, such as: ydtad ΊΤΡ ( Arabic jhj), yätdr τη* ( Arabic j hj), gäbdn ] 3Λ, ' äqäswpy, gäba nan ( in Syriac we find χπτρ and xnaa); qvtäl (= Vys), such as: bäsä'i wya ( Ex 36: 8), akin to a TH ' wya* form; 1 9 and qatul, such as: gäba ( TH naa) and perhaps sätäm onw. The developments within SH may be explained on the basis of this assumption. 4.1.3.18 It is relevant to know that the auxiliary vowel that developed in the monosyllabic patterns — the TH segholates — is a here, which is unusual, since we would assume that the origin of äkäl is the same as that of TH Vax because of aklimma oVax, that qäbdr is the cognate of nap because of qabri and qabru, and even that säkär may be the cognate of Tat? ( Pr 11: 18) and, therefore, its declension is sakru. We need not add that gäddl is TH Via, as is evident from 1 9 The use of the feqqäd pattern in the function of the infinitive in SA — and not only in SA— is clearly attested by the interchange of \\" » KSD/ TSD in ST Ex 5: 23 to express wassdl ( TH Vsm). This pattern is also common in MH with '\\" V roots, e. g., ' ΚΏΤ (\\" doubt whether the tithe was [ properly] taken\\"), ' XVA (\\" an open place\\"), ' WS (\\" vacancy,\\" \\" emptiness\\"). << Chapter >> Home | TOC | Index t
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