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244 Noun with πψψ

by Zeev Ben-Hayyim
244  Noun with πψψ, 4 ππχ  in MH, or in the declension of the noun, as with tfx : iwx and Μ : iaa. Such nouns should be treated as having been generated from triradical roots, and in any case, structurally that is how they are in historical Hebrew. Such expansions, however, are not always indentical in TH and SH. For example, ai in TH has a biradical root, just like τ , while in SH the root has been expanded to oW: the forms irai and m are pronounced dammdm and dammi in SH. In classifying the nouns and noun patterns, we have employed the root form that is necessary or most likely according to the linguistic tradi­tion of SH. Therefore, for example, the root of tzr » is biradical despite the exist­ence in Aramaic of  ΓΡΧ, the root of ny is nMny without regard to the various etymological derivations from m y or from ry, and the root of sissa TWW in SH is vrwt; and not ttrrw ( not to mention PS sdt). The SH counterpart of TH Tiw is T W , and ΤΗ m o has as its SH equivalent n o . Wherever this classification is inconsistent with regard to Proto- Hebrew ( or to what is accepted in the his-torical grammar of TH), this reflects the historical development of SH. 4.0.6. In patterns in which changes occur in the declension of their nouns, the changes have been mentioned in detail according to their type, but quantita-tive changes in vowels have not been considered changes, since they are auto­matic: a short vowel appears in a closed syllable, a long one in an open sylla­ble. This is not so of qualitative changes, which cannot be predicted by general rules, but each is a type unto itself. 4.0.7 Three different sets of letters will be used here to indicate the noun roots in patterns, in order to avoid confusion among the historical stages and vari­ous versions of Hebrew: fqd for SH, Vyo for TH, and qtl for Proto- Hebrew. Just as in the treatment of verbs the quadriradical roots were treated belonging to the stems in which the second radical is geminated, so in the nouns patterns as well, the quadriradicals will be listed among the patterns with gemination of one consonant, as long as, from the perspective of the noun, there is no difference between the two. For patterns based on two consonants ( from  weak roots), the first two of the three representative consonants ( e. g., f and q of fqd) will be employed to describe the pattern, without regard to the location of the weakness ( 4.1.2). In patterns of four and five consonants, the third and, if necessary, also the second of the three consonant symbols will be repeated ( 4.1.4.11- 12), without regard to their gemination in the root. 4 If the vocalization Drrwuft in Ezek 45: 13 is an authentic tradition, the verb TWO was born when Biblical Hebrew was still  a spoken language. In any case, it exists in later Hebrew, e. g., τ\\ ψψΏ meaning hexagon. Chapter Home  | TOC  | Index t

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244 Noun with πψψ, 4 ππχ in MH, or in the declension of the noun, as with tfx : iwx and Μ : iaa. Such nouns should be treated as having been generated from triradical roots, and in any case, structurally that is how they are in historical Hebrew. Such expansions, however, are not always indentical in TH and SH. For example, ai in TH has a biradical root, just like τ , while in SH the root has been expanded to o'W: the forms irai and m are pronounced dammdm and dammi in SH. In classifying the nouns and noun patterns, we have employed the root form that is necessary or most likely according to the linguistic tradi­tion of SH. Therefore, for example, the root of tzr » is biradical despite the exist­ence in Aramaic of ' ΓΡΧ, the root of ny is nMny without regard to the various etymological derivations from m y or from ry, and the root of sissa TWW in SH is vrwt; and not ttrrw ( not to mention PS sdt). The SH counterpart of TH Tiw is T W , and ΤΗ m o has as its SH equivalent n o . Wherever this classification is inconsistent with regard to Proto- Hebrew ( or to what is accepted in the his-torical grammar of TH), this reflects the historical development of SH. 4.0.6. In patterns in which changes occur in the declension of their nouns, the changes have been mentioned in detail according to their type, but quantita-tive changes in vowels have not been considered changes, since they are auto­matic: a short vowel appears in a closed syllable, a long one in an open sylla­ble. This is not so of qualitative changes, which cannot be predicted by general rules, but each is a type unto itself. 4.0.7 Three different sets of letters will be used here to indicate the noun roots in patterns, in order to avoid confusion among the historical stages and vari­ous versions of Hebrew: fqd for SH, V'yo for TH, and qtl for Proto- Hebrew. Just as in the treatment of verbs the quadriradical roots were treated belonging to the stems in which the second radical is geminated, so in the nouns patterns as well, the quadriradicals will be listed among the patterns with gemination of one consonant, as long as, from the perspective of the noun, there is no difference between the two. For patterns based on two consonants ( from \\" weak\\" roots), the first two of the three representative consonants ( e. g., f and q of fqd) will be employed to describe the pattern, without regard to the location of the weakness ( 4.1.2). In patterns of four and five consonants, the third and, if necessary, also the second of the three consonant symbols will be repeated ( 4.1.4.11- 12), without regard to their gemination in the root. 4 If the vocalization Drrwuft in Ezek 45: 13 is an authentic tradition, the verb TWO was born when Biblical Hebrew was still a spoken language. In any case, it exists in later Hebrew, e. g., τ\\\\ ψψΏ meaning \\" hexagon.\\" << Chapter >> Home | TOC | Index t
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