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4. N O U N 4.0 Preliminaries

by Zeev Ben-Hayyim
4. N O U N 4.0 Preliminaries 4.0.1 On the formation of Hebrew words and the analysis of their structural components, see above 2.0.1- 4. The primary manner of noun formation in Biblical Hebrew, including SH, is by means of a noun pattern ( Vpra) — a combination of root and infixed formative. Far less common is a combination of base and suffix formative — the latter a suffix such as %, n, n, or o. In classifying nouns one should distin­guish between nouns in compound patterns bearing endings, such as nwn% ηρΉ, n*? np, o^ Vinn, and onns, and nouns in which the same endings indicate feminine forms as distinct from masculine, or plural forms as distinct from singular, such as: nV% maw, and onaw. Examples of the first type are categorized as a matter of word formation, while examples of the second must be categorized according to the masculine singular form — the absolute form. Certain nouns, such as D? a~ j2, may be variously considered in either of the two categories. Since not all nouns occur in their absolute form in the Pentateuch, and the full de­clension does not appear for all the nouns whose absolute form does appear, there is no alternative to listing reconstructed forms. A reconstructed absolute form is given where no such form appears in SP. This is so even where it does appear in the Tiberian Biblical text, because we cannot draw conclusions about SH on the basis of evidence from TH. Instead, our knowledge of extra- Biblical Samaritan Hebrew has provided the basis for reconstructed noun forms in the language of SP. In reconstructed forms, there is considerable doubt regarding the short vowels a — a, especially when they appear in an unaccented syllable, since in the declension of certain nouns, those vowels tend to be interchange­able. In particular, a in a closed syllable may be replaced by ä in an open syllable. 4.0.2 The character of the root and Hebrew phonological rules cause a par­ticular noun pattern formative to apply to several forms different in appear­ance ( surface forms); for example, the --- pattern in TH includes from the root T*? a, the noun *$ a; from the root rr^ a, the noun rr a; from the root Vya, the noun ^ a ; from the root , MDI, the noun  oa ( pausal form) and pa ( absolute and con- Chapter Home  | TOC  | Index

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4. N O U N 4.0 Preliminaries 4.0.1 On the formation of Hebrew words and the analysis of their structural components, see above 2.0.1- 4. The primary manner of noun formation in Biblical Hebrew, including SH, is by means of a noun pattern ( Vpra) — a combination of root and infixed formative. Far less common is a combination of base and suffix formative — the latter a suffix such as %, n, n, or o. In classifying nouns one should distin­guish between nouns in compound patterns bearing endings, such as nwn% ηρΉ, n*? np, o^ Vinn, and onns, and nouns in which the same endings indicate feminine forms as distinct from masculine, or plural forms as distinct from singular, such as: nV% maw, and onaw. Examples of the first type are categorized as a matter of word formation, while examples of the second must be categorized according to the masculine singular form — the absolute form. Certain nouns, such as D? a~ j2, may be variously considered in either of the two categories. Since not all nouns occur in their absolute form in the Pentateuch, and the full de­clension does not appear for all the nouns whose absolute form does appear, there is no alternative to listing reconstructed forms. A reconstructed absolute form is given where no such form appears in SP. This is so even where it does appear in the Tiberian Biblical text, because we cannot draw conclusions about SH on the basis of evidence from TH. Instead, our knowledge of extra- Biblical Samaritan Hebrew has provided the basis for reconstructed noun forms in the language of SP. In reconstructed forms, there is considerable doubt regarding the short vowels a — a, especially when they appear in an unaccented syllable, since in the declension of certain nouns, those vowels tend to be interchange­able. In particular, a in a closed syllable may be replaced by ä in an open syllable. 4.0.2 The character of the root and Hebrew phonological rules cause a par­ticular noun pattern formative to apply to several forms different in appear­ance ( surface forms); for example, the --- pattern in TH includes from the root T*? a, the noun *$ a; from the root rr^ a, the noun rr> a; from the root V'ya, the noun ^ a ; from the root , MDI, the noun \\" oa ( pausal form) and pa ( absolute and con- << Chapter >> Home | TOC | Index
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