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2.1 Strong Verb 115 This

by Zeev Ben-Hayyim
2.1 Strong Verb 115 This may have begun, as in TH, in forms with sewa, such as ΤΗ D^ pna, 3 3 and then spread to other forms, as well. The phenomenon was originally a pho­netic variant and this may explain why no entire paradigm has been found and why yny verbs following this pattern are especially numerous — for the simpli­fication of the second radical doubling is quite understandable because of dis­similation, and even the simplification of the geminated yod vocalized with sewa is well known. It should be mentioned that the verb rrre, whose conjuga­tion today is that of Piel  with simple second radical, is ascribed by Abu Ishäq, ( LOT I, 49, 57) to the Piel  with geminated second radical. Both patterns may be assumed to have been customary in his time, the verb having been pronounced in various ways, while more recently the  simple second radical form became more common. As evidence for this explanation one has an infinitive form such as pan zimon in SA ( LOTIII/ 2,172). This pattern with a geminated second radical is the usual nomen actionis of Piel ( see its counter­part in the Babylonian vocalization of Hebrew in n. 30 above). 2.1.4 Nifal 2.1.4.0 As already noted ( 2.1.3.0), the Samaritan tradition makes a distinction between two Nifal types:  with simple second radical and  with geminated second radical, the first of these being the more regular and the original form, with parallels in the other Hebrew traditions. With Simple Second Radical 2.1.4.1 Perfect. The main difference between SH and the other Hebrew tradi­tions is in the regular doubling of the first radical, except for a few cases to be considered below. Thus, the paradigm of the perfect is as follows: 3rd fem. niffäqäda ( nifqädä) rnpsj niffäqädu nps:. 2.1.4.2 The doubling of the first radical is of course found in TH and outside it in the ry root type, as in *? iaj, nlyj, and  it is a regular feature in the traditions of MH: p i J . The explanation offered3 4  with regard to these biblical forms is also my article  Additional Elucidation, Lesonenu 59 ( 1996), 93ff. [ Hebrew] ( see further 2.2.2.1.1). 3 3 I already stated in  Medial  Sewa 88 that this way was more common in Hebrew traditions than is apparent in  TH. 3 4 E. g., BL, 400. 2nd masc. 2nd fem. 3rd masc. 1st niffäqäd ( nifqad) ipsa singular niffäqädti nnpsa niffäqädtä mpsj niffäqädti mpsj plural niffäqädnu inpsa niffäqädtimma nmpzi niffäqädtdn pipsn niffäqädu nps3 Chapter Home  | TOC  | Index t t t

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2.1 Strong Verb 115 This may have begun, as in TH, in forms with sewa, such as ΤΗ D^ pna, 3 3 and then spread to other forms, as well. The phenomenon was originally a pho­netic variant and this may explain why no entire paradigm has been found and why yny verbs following this pattern are especially numerous — for the simpli­fication of the second radical doubling is quite understandable because of dis­similation, and even the simplification of the geminated yod vocalized with sewa is well known. It should be mentioned that the verb rrre, whose conjuga­tion today is that of Pi'el \\" with simple second radical,\\" is ascribed by Abu Ishäq, ( LOT I, 49, 57) to the Pi'el \\" with geminated second radical.\\" Both patterns may be assumed to have been customary in his time, the verb having been pronounced in various ways, while more recently the \\" simple second radical\\" form became more common. As evidence for this explanation one has an infinitive form such as pan zimon in SA ( LOTIII/ 2,172). This pattern with a geminated second radical is the usual nomen actionis of Pi'el ( see its counter­part in the Babylonian vocalization of Hebrew in n. 30 above). 2.1.4 Nif'al 2.1.4.0 As already noted ( 2.1.3.0), the Samaritan tradition makes a distinction between two Nif'al types: \\" with simple second radical\\" and \\" with geminated second radical,\\" the first of these being the more regular and the original form, with parallels in the other Hebrew traditions. With Simple Second Radical 2.1.4.1 Perfect. The main difference between SH and the other Hebrew tradi­tions is in the regular doubling of the first radical, except for a few cases to be considered below. Thus, the paradigm of the perfect is as follows: 3rd fem. niffäqäda ( nifqädä) rnpsj niffäqädu nps:. 2.1.4.2 The doubling of the first radical is of course found in TH and outside it in the ry root type, as in *? iaj, nlyj, and it is a regular feature in the traditions of MH: p i J . The explanation offered3 4 with regard to these biblical forms is also my article \\" Additional Elucidation,\\" Lesonenu 59 ( 1996), 93ff. [ Hebrew] ( see further 2.2.2.1.1). 3 3 I already stated in \\" Medial Sewa\\" 88 that this way was more common in Hebrew traditions than is apparent in TH. 3 4 E. g., BL, 400. 2nd masc. 2nd fem. 3rd masc. 1st niffäqäd ( nifqad) ipsa singular niffäqädti nnpsa niffäqädtä mpsj niffäqädti mpsj plural niffäqädnu inpsa niffäqädtimma nmpzi niffäqädtdn pipsn niffäqädu nps3 << Chapter >> Home | TOC | Index t t t
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