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2.1 Strong Verb 109 singular

by Zeev Ben-Hayyim
2.1 Strong Verb 109 singular plural nifqad ipsa tifqädu rrpsn; tifqädon jnpsn tifqädinna nnpsn yifqädu nps* » ; yifqädon γηρν* tifqädinna nnpsn 2nd fem. 3rd masc. 3rd fem. 2nd pers masc. 1st ifqäd ipDX tifqäd ipsn tifqädi npsn yifqäd ip& tifqäd ipsn Similarly, for iatfn in TH one finds tismär in SH, just as for ηχρη there is tiqsär, etc., in all cases. 2.1.1.7 Qal Β. Nevertheless, in a number of cases SH recognizes another pat­tern that produces an a vowel between the first and second radicals, with a corresponding shift in the preformative vowel. For example: tezäkär nam, yebäqär n p r , yedäqär Ί ρ τ , wyefäsar nssn, wyefäsäl xnsr\\. This pattern resem­bles that of Piel Β ( see 2.1.3.5), and differs from it in the vowel of its second radical, which is ä( ä) here but usually e( e) there. This difference could, at first glance, be ignored and verbs of this pattern classified as Piel B, except that the perfect tense of these verbs are conjugated according to that of Qal. For this reason it is best to adopt the position taken by those Samaritan grammarians who view this pattern as a variant mode of the Qal imperfect. Indeed, it even seems that this pattern results from the regular conjugation. In many forms of various verbs an auxiliary vowel first developed to break up the consonant clusters which were felt to be uncomfortable in pronunciation; in time, this vowel grew stronger, and the prefix syllable opened and its vowel changed in quality and quantity  according to the accepted rules ( 1.3.4); thus: * yifsar  * yifsär yefasär. 24  The intermediate stage described here occurs here and there in TH as well:  p n r or p n r with a sdwa mobile ( Gn 21: 6); iVann or  f? ann ( Jer 22: 15); the general rule, of course, in verbs whose first radical is guttural: ia^ r etc. This stage serves as the basis of common forms with the Babylonian vocalization: (^ yiserefu ) isrror, but in the Babylonian tradition the second sewa quiesces, and does not develop into an independent vowel. The rare nature of this TH pattern in the strong verb and its frequency in  guttural verbs ( see 2.2.2.1.3) indicate that its origin was phonetic. 2.1.1.8 In isolated instances, the vowel of the preformative is a, and the forms resemble in this those of Hifil, except that they have no i after their second radical, like yatqau ( Nu 10: 8) iypn% yatqäeu ( Ex 10: 19) i n y p m , wtalla ( Gn 47: 13) nVm, wyätäneu ( Ex 32: 20) mntm, and perhaps even wyärä: bäk ( Dt 8: 3) ηι^ ττ ( see 2.2.2.2.4). This feature is reminiscent of similar ones in TH, such as 2 4 See Yeivin, Babylonian Vocalization, 33. I have already noted  this in  Samaritan Hebrew, 125, where I referred to similar forms in Greek transcription. Chapter Home  | TOC  | Index t

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2.1 Strong Verb 109 singular plural nifqad ipsa tifqädu rrpsn; tifqädon jnpsn tifqädinna nnpsn yifqädu nps* » ; yifqädon γηρν* tifqädinna nnpsn 2nd fem. 3rd masc. 3rd fem. 2nd pers masc. 1st ifqäd ipDX tifqäd ipsn tifqädi npsn yifqäd ip& tifqäd ipsn Similarly, for iatfn in TH one finds tismär in SH, just as for ηχρη there is tiqsär, etc., in all cases. 2.1.1.7 Qal Β. Nevertheless, in a number of cases SH recognizes another pat­tern that produces an a vowel between the first and second radicals, with a corresponding shift in the preformative vowel. For example: tezäkär nam, yebäqär n p r , yedäqär Ί ρ τ , wyefäsar nssn, wyefäsäl xnsr\\\\. This pattern resem­bles that of Pi'el Β ( see 2.1.3.5), and differs from it in the vowel of its second radical, which is ä( ä) here but usually e( e) there. This difference could, at first glance, be ignored and verbs of this pattern classified as Pi'el B, except that the perfect tense of these verbs are conjugated according to that of Qal. For this reason it is best to adopt the position taken by those Samaritan grammarians who view this pattern as a variant mode of the Qal imperfect. Indeed, it even seems that this pattern results from the regular conjugation. In many forms of various verbs an auxiliary vowel first developed to break up the consonant clusters which were felt to be uncomfortable in pronunciation; in time, this vowel grew stronger, and the prefix syllable opened and its vowel changed in quality and quantity according to the accepted rules ( 1.3.4); thus: * yifsar > * yifsär > yefasär. 24 The intermediate stage described here occurs here and there in TH as well: p n r or p n r with a sdwa mobile ( Gn 21: 6); iVann or \\" f? ann ( Jer 22: 15); the general rule, of course, in verbs whose first radical is guttural: ia^ r etc. This stage serves as the basis of common forms with the Babylonian vocalization: (^ yiserefu >) isrror, but in the Babylonian tradition the second sewa quiesces, and does not develop into an independent vowel. The rare nature of this TH pattern in the strong verb and its frequency in \\" guttural\\" verbs ( see 2.2.2.1.3) indicate that its origin was phonetic. 2.1.1.8 In isolated instances, the vowel of the preformative is a, and the forms resemble in this those of Hif'il, except that they have no i after their second radical, like yatqa'u ( Nu 10: 8) iypn% yatqä'e'u ( Ex 10: 19) i n y p m , wtalla ( Gn 47: 13) nVm, wyätäne'u ( Ex 32: 20) mntm, and perhaps even wyärä: bäk ( Dt 8: 3) ηι^ ττ ( see 2.2.2.2.4). This feature is reminiscent of similar ones in TH, such as 2 4 See Yeivin, Babylonian Vocalization, 33. I have already noted this in \\" Samaritan Hebrew,\\" 125, where I referred to similar forms in Greek transcription. << Chapter >> Home | TOC | Index t
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