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A Commentary on the Book of Genesis (Part II): from Noah to Abraham

by Umberto Moshe David Cassuto;

Bibliographic information

TitleA Commentary on the Book of Genesis (Part II): from Noah to Abraham
AuthorUmberto Moshe David Cassuto;
PublisherVarda Books
Publication Date2005
SubjectTorah/Bible
Pages404


Description 

FROM THE TRANSLATOR'S FORWORD:

From Noah To Abraham is the second volume in a series of comprehensive commentaries on the Book of Genesis that the late Professor Umberto Cassuto had planned as part of a magnum opus embracing the whole Pentateuch and also the Book of Psalms. The first volume bears a separate title, From Adam To Noah, but in the present book the author refers to it as Part I, in order to emphasize the relationship of the two volumes as an exegetical sequence...

Now, by extending his method of exegesis in this volume to another section of the Torah, Cassuto indirectly buttressed
his theories with new evidence of the inherent rightness of his approach. Just as in the realm of physics or chemistry every additional experiment that produces results consonant with a given hypothesis is regarded as added confirmation of its probability, so in the sphere of Biblical studies the successful extension of the area of exposition serves to validate the commentator's interpretative principles. These considerations apart, the present work is rich in original insights and scholarly illuminations that make it an invaluable guide to the Bible studentbe he an erudite scholar or just a well-read lay enquirerirrespective of the opinions he holds with regard to the Higher Critical doctrines...

Man proposes . . . It was not, alas, Cassuto's destiny, to our infinite sorrow, to complete his plans. At the fifth verse of the thirteenth chapter of the first book of the Torah the pen fell from his strengthless hand. The sudden and untimely passing of Cassuto, when he was at the height of his scholarly creativity, was an immeasurable loss to Jewish scholarship as a whole, and more specifically to Bible research and exposition. Even the fragment from the third volume of his commentary on Genesis is a brilliant example of exegetical writing. I shall, I believe, be voicing the views of many Biblical exegetes when I declare that we cannot but be grateful that this segment of his contemplated work was vouchsafed us, although the heart yearns for what the maestro still had in his mind but was not granted to bequeath to us in writing.





About the Author 

Umberto Moshe David Cassuto;, tr. Israel Abrahams ---

Prof. Cassuto, Umberto Moshe David (1885-1951), Bible scholar. Born in Florence, Italy, he studied there at the university and the Collegio Rabbinico. After graduating in humanities and receiving his rabbinic diploma, he took up teaching positions in both institutions.

(1885-1951), Bible scholar. Born in Florence, Italy, he studied there at the university and the Collegio Rabbinico. After graduating in humanities and receiving his rabbinic diploma, he took up teaching positions in both institutions. At this time his main research was on the history and literature of the Jews of Italy.

From 1914 to 1925 Cassuto was chief rabbi of Florence and then in 1925 became professor of Hebrew language and literature in the University of Florence and then took the chair of Hebrew at the University of Rome. Here he began to catalogue the Hebrew manuscripts in the Vatican but the 1938 anti-Semitic laws forced him out of his positions and he continued his academic career at the Hebrew University, Jerusalem. He edited a Bible with Hebrew commentary that has remained an Israel school classic.

His interests focused on Bible exegesis in which he contested the documentary theory of Wellhausen on the origin of the Pentateuch, postulating its redaction to a school around the 10th century BCE. Cassuto also made important contributions to Ugaritic studies.


Prof. Israel Abrahams--English translator of Cassuto's workswas an outstanding Hebrew scholar in his own right.Born March 30, 1903 in Vilna, Lithuania, he came to Cape Town, South Africa in 1937 and for more than thirty years--since Augustof that year until mid-1968--held the position of Chief Rabbi of that city. Upon retirement, he made aliyah and passed away in Jerusalem in October 1973.






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A Commentary on the Book of Genesis (Part II): from  Noah to AbrahamA Commentary on the Book of Genesis (Part II): from Noah to Abraham


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