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Preface This is a reference

by John C Skipper
Preface This is a reference book. The reader has the right to expect a clearly defined scope, spe-cific criteria for inclusion, and 100 percent inclusion of everything that meets those criteria. Those were the objectives of A Biographical Dictionary of the Baseball Hall of Fame when the first edition was published in 2000. They remain the same with this second edition— which has been updated to include more than 50 new biographies of players, managers, umpires, baseball executives, broadcasters and writers who have earned their place among the greats of the game in the past eight years. Those objectives are easily met in this work, as they were in the first book, because of the work of others, primarily the Baseball Writers Association of America and an adjunct group called the Veterans Committee. The baseball writers cast ballots each year while the Veterans Committee meets every two years to determine who will be the next to be enshrined in the Hall of Fame. It is not the purpose of this book to evaluate their work or their judgment. Rather, the purpose is to acknowledge the results by providing biographical information and data on each new Hall of Fame member— and leave it to readers to make their own evalua-tions. It should be noted that while 91 broadcasters and writers have been recognized by the Hall of Fame, these individuals received the Ford C. Frick Award ( broadcasters) or the J. G. Taylor Spink Award ( writers) and were not inducted. ( There is no writers’ or announcers’ wing of the Hall of Fame, despite the widespread belief that both exist.) However, because of the popular belief that the award recognition is for writers and broadcasters tantamount to enshrinement— certainly no higher honor is be bestowed on a writer or broadcaster— all receive entries in the biographical dictionary. The statistics of baseball are as precise as the game itself is imprecise. Baseball has been described as “ a game of inches’’ whereby a ball hit or thrown “ just a little more this way or that way” would have affected the outcome. Success or failure of a team has often come down to a “ this way” or “ that way” direction of the ball. If Willie McCovey’s line drive with two outs in the ninth inning of the 1962 World Series had been two inches higher, Yankee sec-ond baseman Bobby Richardson wouldn’t have caught it, two runs would have scored, and the Giants— not the Yankees— would have won the World Series. The “ this way, that way” uncertainty of baseball is one of the things that keeps the game interesting and is certainly one of the delights of the game for its fans. In contrast, the fascination of baseball for the researcher is the precision of its record-keeping for well over a century. Henry Chadwick, a native of Great Britain, was a journalist 1

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Preface This is a reference book. The reader has the right to expect a clearly defined scope, spe-cific criteria for inclusion, and 100 percent inclusion of everything that meets those criteria. Those were the objectives of A Biographical Dictionary of the Baseball Hall of Fame when the first edition was published in 2000. They remain the same with this second edition— which has been updated to include more than 50 new biographies of players, managers, umpires, baseball executives, broadcasters and writers who have earned their place among the greats of the game in the past eight years. Those objectives are easily met in this work, as they were in the first book, because of the work of others, primarily the Baseball Writers Association of America and an adjunct group called the Veterans Committee. The baseball writers cast ballots each year while the Veterans Committee meets every two years to determine who will be the next to be enshrined in the Hall of Fame. It is not the purpose of this book to evaluate their work or their judgment. Rather, the purpose is to acknowledge the results by providing biographical information and data on each new Hall of Fame member— and leave it to readers to make their own evalua-tions. It should be noted that while 91 broadcasters and writers have been recognized by the Hall of Fame, these individuals received the Ford C. Frick Award ( broadcasters) or the J. G. Taylor Spink Award ( writers) and were not inducted. ( There is no writers’ or announcers’ wing of the Hall of Fame, despite the widespread belief that both exist.) However, because of the popular belief that the award recognition is for writers and broadcasters tantamount to enshrinement— certainly no higher honor is be bestowed on a writer or broadcaster— all receive entries in the biographical dictionary. The statistics of baseball are as precise as the game itself is imprecise. Baseball has been described as “ a game of inches’’ whereby a ball hit or thrown “ just a little more this way or that way” would have affected the outcome. Success or failure of a team has often come down to a “ this way” or “ that way” direction of the ball. If Willie McCovey’s line drive with two outs in the ninth inning of the 1962 World Series had been two inches higher, Yankee sec-ond baseman Bobby Richardson wouldn’t have caught it, two runs would have scored, and the Giants— not the Yankees— would have won the World Series. The “ this way, that way” uncertainty of baseball is one of the things that keeps the game interesting and is certainly one of the delights of the game for its fans. In contrast, the fascination of baseball for the researcher is the precision of its record-keeping for well over a century. Henry Chadwick, a native of Great Britain, was a journalist 1
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